Finished Any Games Lately?

Agree with everything Spikeout wrote about Prince of Persia: The Lost Crown, except I'd rate it above Hollow Knight; might just be a purely personal taste thing though, as they're both excellent.

Just finished Ori and the Blind Forest after playing off and on for a good while. I love the art style. Gameplay? It was fine. I'm probably not the best judge for it. I'll have to put side scrolling metroidvanias in the same category as real-time strategies and Diablo-style RPG's. I like them well enough, but ultimately there are other types of games I'd much rather be playing.

Also with their respective clubs-
Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire- an improvement over the first, but there are several RPG's I've preferred in recent years.

Severed Steel- quick and fun action that didn't wear out its welcome.

Just finished RE Village. Man it was nice playing a content-packed game of only 12 hours. It was so quality and had very little filler.

Also that team is a master of their craft. They understand very well how to develop gameplay and power levels and keep you from doing the same thing too often. At the start I was a little weakling but by the end it was

Spoiler:

basically COD

Man what a trip. Anyway, it mayyybe wasn’t as tight of a package as RE7 but I definitely still enjoyed it.

Not finished with the game, but I've pretty much done everything I wanted to do in WoW: Dragonflight.

This was an excellent expansion, the best since Legion.

So glad you enjoyed it. I keep wanting to go back, but the reason I dropped out of Dragonflight is that I had just had enough after eighteen years. The next expansion looks promising to me, too, but I don't want to drop out after getting my first couple of alts to max level.

Veloxi wrote:

Credits rolled on Robocop: Rogue City.

f*ck, that was sooooo good...

The man said it all. Thank you for turning my attention to it, Veloxi.

This game is absolutely amazing! A grizzled cynic can find dozens of objective shortcomings, yet literally none of them matter as they are consistent with the production level. There are two main maps that are heavily reused: the precinct and the city map, consisting of several blocks. Then there is the OCP headquarters, and several others.

The game bounces between mundane police work and, effectively, shooting galleries in which you as the RoboCop walk and pop heads like ketchup-filled balloons. No jumping and no crouching either - it's awesome! Makes sense, as RoboCOp was never known as a parkour expert and the ever-present booming footsteps of his metal soles will keep reminding you that you are basically a walking armor with a couple of squishy bits tucked deep inside.

The simplicity of the combat is deceptive, especially once you get some upgrades on your visor (enemies get marked with neon green outlines - shooting gallery, as I said) and the absolutely overwhelmingly awesome AUTO 9. You will find the PCB upgrade with full-auto fire AND endless auto-feed (no reload). The destruction the gun will inflict past that milestone is both ridiculous and funny, other weapons just won't matter anymore. It's like a cheat at that point, but the game makes no big deal out of it - it's just there, you can use it or not. It's RoboCop's world and you're the robo-man. You almost start feeling sorry about the mercs and scum that keeps throwing themselves at you and your handheld remote woodchipper. Like, don't they watch news, don't they know what's coming at them? You'd think, at least past the story mid-point, they SHOULD know...

Other "shortcomings", aside from map reusage: Other characters are not more than set pieces, there to just deliver missions, there is quite a bit of walking around for fetch quests, the AUTO 9 PCB modules "puzzle" sub-game is mostly just a minor forced inconvenience, and the branching story does not seem to make a lot of difference in the outcome. But it all just works, it's all optimized for the full experience, under the constraints. There is no pretension, maniacal ambition, artsy bull nor arrogance here, this is a simple shooter with basic branching dialogue and its purpose is brainless fun, no more and no less.

RoboCop: RogueCity is bigger than the square of its parts, rather than just of sum. And it's often on sale. No weaknesses.

Beautifully said, el_dino. So if you look on YouTube, the game has a few endings based on your dialogue choices, and some are surprising. On my second playthrough with New Game +, I got a slightly different ending on the Mayoral race, for example.

Also do the NG+. Eventually you can max out every skill tree and it is a deeeeeeeeeelight.

I gotta play this game, because the way you describe him just walking around shooting things is the main thing I loved about the Space Marine FPS. Space Marines don't do parkour, and they don't take cover. They *are* cover.

Oh yeah, this isn't a cover shooter. You're a walking tank. SOMETIMES you need to take cover, but it's rare and it makes sense. I mean he took cover in the film here and there so it works.

Brilliant f*cking game, especially if you're a Robo fan.

BadKen wrote:

I gotta play this game, because the way you describe him just walking around shooting things is the main thing I loved about the Space Marine FPS. Space Marines don't do parkour, and they don't take cover. They *are* cover.

The Emperor protects!

Rolled credits on Tears of the Kingdom.

Much like in Breath of the Wild, I probably could have finished the main quest and rolled credits a couple dozen hours earlier, but like... why?

Great game to put down for a while and pick back up again. Great world to come back to and spend time in. There are flaws I could point to, but none that make a dent in the overall experience. Great game.

IMAGE(https://image.api.playstation.com/vulcan/ap/rnd/202208/0806/hrgJ5M7aLoXdo75mdX48A67k.jpg)

Cloudpunk

The very definition of a vibes-based game. Cloudpunk puts you in the shoes of Rania, a newly employed driver for the titular Cloudpunk - a semi-legal delivery service that will take any package anywhere in the neon-drenched city of Nivalis, no questions asked.

Given that this is a cyberpunk dystopia, the lazy comparison would be with Blade Runner. But the movie I was most reminded of was Michael Mann’s stylish Collateral. Like Collateral, Cloudpunk unfolds over the course of a single night during which a driver protagonist is drawn deeper and deeper into intrigue and danger.

Gameplay-wise, there is not much going on here. Cloudpunk is basically a walking simulator. Or, to be more accurate, a walking / driving / flying simulator, given that you spend most of your time zooming around in a flying car. Nine-tenths of the game is following nav-point directions from one place to another, with the story threads unfurling via the deliveries you make and your conversations with your grizzled dispatcher over the radio. There are a few choices to make here and there, but nothing that changes the direction of the narrative.

The real star of the show here is Navalis itself, the city. From what I’ve read, the dev team for this was small, and they've constructed a remarkable place out of their voxel graphics. What you can do here is limited; you can't enter any of the buildings, for example, unless it is part of a quest, which rarely happens. Even so, the city feels alive and real, and the visuals are striking.

Shoutout, too, for your car's onboard computer, Camus, which is actually the soul and personality of your character's deceased dog. Rania chats frequently with Camus during delivery jobs, and his canine naivete is a sweet and effective counterbalance to the cynicism of Rania and most of the other characters you meet. Without giving too much away, I was really touched by the ending that Camus got.

All in all, a chill little experience to knock out in a few sessions before bedtime. The dev has another game set in the same city that is due to come out this year with much a greater depth and breadth of possibilities, and I’m looking forward to seeing what they can pull off.

IMAGE(https://images.nintendolife.com/screenshots/94661/900x.jpg)

Pikuniku

If you’re anything like me, you have probably spent far too many hours of your life pondering the eternal question: "What would Teletubbies be like if Teletubbies was a 2D puzzle-platformer about driving a comedically evil corporation out of the town that they are trying to take over?"

Well, okay, you probably haven’t thought about it very much. But if you had, I would point you in the direction of Pikuniku.

This is an absurd game - delightful and hilarious in equal measures. The player controls Piku, who is... IDK, a red blob with legs, I guess... as he/it explores a primary-colored world, discovering secrets and adventures, meeting zany characters, and partaking in various mini games. There are boss battles, too, but Pikuniku bends over backwards to be approachable and accessible, and all challenges are eminently doable with a bit of persistence.

Pikuniku wasn't new to me, per se; my son has completed it about five times! I decided to take three-ish hours to knock it out myself before it left Game Pass today - and I'm glad I did, because it really put a smile on this grizzled old face of mine.

I finished Dragon's Dogma 2 twenty minutes ago.

I really ran out of desire to play the game this week, so I was glad that the main quest was short (by modern standards) giving me an early off-ramp.

I really enjoyed my first dozen hours or so; it was great to play an ostensibly genre game that managed to be so idiosyncratic. However, in truth, the game had given everything it had to give by about 12 hours. The combat didn't develop any additional wrinkles. The main quest remained forgettable. The side-quests were still cookie-cutter. The relationships - such as they were - stayed cardboard-flat.

Apparently, New Game+ is now available, but I have no desire to repeat the game.

Even though this series doesn't have all that much gameplay it goes along with the "holiday" today of May the 4th.

Finished the 3 episodes of Vader Immortal, the VR series. Had fun with it. It really puts you right in the Star Wars universe. It has a bunch of the hallmarks from the series. Work alongside an annoying droid, get to go to hyperspace, use one of the most badass lightsabers I've seen, use the force, fight a rancor, kill lots of storm troopers, face off against Vader.

It's all good fun like a Disney ride and still looks very good for a VR only game. They really did a great job with the character animations and the locations look fantastic. And top that off with some great audio and music and you've got yourself a fantastic VR experience.

The last episode sets up a new adventure but given it's been about 5 years since the last episode I doubt we're seeing another go at this.

With the May the 4th sale this was $10 for all 3 episodes, each one lasting about 40-45 minutes. So was worth it to me.

Unpacking is done. I expected this would be short, cute and relaxing. It was indeed short and cute. Not so much relaxing. I found myself getting mildly irritated when I put a bunch of stuff away only to run out of space for everything to be optimally organized together. I was too impatient to take everything out and redo it; I just wanted to get it over with and move on. So, basically the game accurately captures the stress I've had unpacking in real life.

In later levels, I tried to adapt by just unloading everything directly onto the floor first so I could see what I had to deal with before putting anything away. This worked, but as all this junk gradually covered the floor, I prayed I could fully empty a box and get rid of it to free up some more floor space before I ran out. It was just anxiety-provoking in a different way.

One thing I noted about the game. It won't allow you to progress to the next level until you have picked everything off the floor. I somehow thought it was a good idea to mention to my wife that the game agreed with me- randomly leaving stuff on the floor is not an acceptable organizational strategy. This did not go over well.

gewy wrote:

One thing I noted about the game. It won't allow you to progress to the next level until you have picked everything off the floor. I somehow thought it was a good idea to mention to my wife that the game agreed with me- randomly leaving stuff on the floor is not an acceptable organizational strategy. This did not go over well.

Fun fact: Unpacking has a secret “dark star” mode that allows you to complete a level if every item is marked as in an incorrect position. So yes, you can leave items out on the floor and move on! I love the modified flavor text on your photo album entries. More info: https://unpacking.fandom.com/wiki/Da...

Also, I adore that game.

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/XqP7eID.jpeg)

Path of Giants

Wholesome little indie puzzler developed by a husband-and-wife team. Guide three explorers through a series of levels, using teamwork to solve challenges and progress.

I played this on Switch, and it's available on every platform, but I believe it started life on mobile. It very much feels like a mobile game - and I don't mean that in a pejorative sense. I'm talking more about the way the game is designed: bite-sized levels, each one of them just a single screen, with a difficulty comfortably in the "casual" category (only at the very end did I start to feel my brain being properly teased). Reminded me of Mekorama, the Go games (Hitman Go and Lara Croft Go)... even Monument Valley, a little.

Cozy way to spend a few evenings, chipping away here and there.

Stellar Blade is the first game I've completed in a while and I loved it!

Clearly inspired by Nier Automata but with a more robust combat system gives it great gameplay. The story is nothing new and the characters are one dimensional but the gameplay and exploration make it a great game.

IMAGE(https://www.gamespot.com/a/uploads/scale_super/1816/18167535/4294000-stellar-blade-can-collectibles-locations-.jpg)

EDIT: I feel compelled to add this OST song for Raven:

A while back I finished Invincible Presents: Atom Eve, a superhero visual novel with light JRPG combat that some of you probably have as an Epic freebie.
I knew nothing about the game, nor the existence of the franchise, but the trailer looked interesting. Basically, it's a retelling of parts of season 1 of the show (which I watched afterwards) with some new/alternate story content added.
It grabbed me and didn't let go until credits rolled. The visual novel had me fully engrossed in Eve's story and the decisions I made felt "right" for who she was in my mind. Turns out Eve and Invincible are a bit different in the show, but most other characters are pretty much the same. I actually think going in not knowing anything about the universe was the best way to experience the story, as I didn't have any "knowledge baggage" guiding my choices.
The turn-based combat is serviceable and there are interesting ways to upgrade Eve's abilities - some of which also add additional visual novel choices.

One way to measure this game's success is to ask if it makes people interested in the franchise; in my case, the answer is a resounding "Yes!"

Cross posting from the “this weekend” thread:

Started and finished Venba yesterday on a flight out of town. It was a great, 90 minute experience with excellent writing, some light cooking puzzles, and a lot of emotion. Between the overall vibes and the way it made me tear up, it felt like playing a Pixar movie.

I recently finished Minute of Islands, a very easy, very short adventure game that deals with topics such as depression and mental illness. I enjoyed it, but I can't say I loved it.

Then I played through The Quarry, and even though it takes it a while to get started, once things got moving I had a blast with it. The results were disastrous, though, as I only got one character to survive unscathed throughout the night. The game never reached the highs of Until Dawn, but at this point I've accepted no other Supermassive game will, so I was not disappointed. If you like this kid of game, it's worth checking out.

Prince of Persia: The Lost Crown

Spikeout said all the things a page or so back. Best metroidvania since Hollow Knight. I can see how it got part of the way there by liberally borrowing from earlier games, but it nails the movement and combat and exploration and all of it just works really well.

Redherring wrote:

Prince of Persia: The Lost Crown

Spikeout said all the things a page or so back. Best metroidvania since Hollow Knight. I can see how it got part of the way there by liberally borrowing from earlier games, but it nails the movement and combat and exploration and all of it just works really well.

*Chef's Kiss*

I got to 94% or 96% completion, I explored every part of the map, did all the side quests, got every item & piece of lore but I found out that to get to 100% you need to upgrade every amulet & your swords etc to the maximum level (all done at the blacksmith).

I really hope this team gets a crack at a sequel because the groundwork laid here is ridiculously good.

The good news is PoP:TLC will be getting 3 free expansions and a paid DLC later this year. Very excited!

merphle wrote:

The good news is PoP:TLC will be getting 3 free expansions and a paid DLC later this year. Very excited!

Oh yes! Didn't know that. Exited to see what additional content they come up with

Spikeout wrote:
Redherring wrote:

Prince of Persia: The Lost Crown

Spikeout said all the things a page or so back. Best metroidvania since Hollow Knight. I can see how it got part of the way there by liberally borrowing from earlier games, but it nails the movement and combat and exploration and all of it just works really well.

*Chef's Kiss*

I got to 94% or 96% completion, I explored every part of the map, did all the side quests, got every item & piece of lore but I found out that to get to 100% you need to upgrade every amulet & your swords etc to the maximum level (all done at the blacksmith).

I think I got to about 90%, some of the coins and ore upgrades were locked behind the tricky platforming bits that I didn’t have the patience / skill / persistence to push through when I was already powerful enough. Once I had swords upgraded to maximum and all the side quests done I just made a beeline for the end bosses.

And.

Horizon: Forbidden West

Played on PS4 two years ago, this time the full game plus Burning Shores on PC.

Such a great game but by the end (where I decided the end was) I felt like the character in that Monty Python scene being absolutely stuffed to bursting point (and beyond).

“Check in with some side character before the epilogue?” aka “A wafer thin mint, sir?”

I finished Immortals of Aveum, which is every bit as good as people are saying it is. I can see why it underperformed financially. At first glance it looks like yet another generic action RPG with a generic story and a map full of icons. And well, it kind of is those things, but it is so well executed. The combat feels great, the writing is snappy and doesn't take itself too seriously. It's just good fun, and it goes to show how much competent execution can elevate the material.

It's a real shame the studio is shutting down, they deserved much better after putting out such a solid game.

Yeah, pretty sure that one was all about the timing. It was up against Baldur's Gate 3 and Armored Core 6. Sad.