Finished Any Games Lately?

merphle wrote:
brokenclavicle wrote:

Young Souls. If you recall being a teenager, especially of the 90's or 80's kind, you'll find this beat'em up RPG to be quite fun. I certainly did.

How many bonfires does it have?

Cero, actually.

Finished Death's Door last night. Watched credits today and that final scene... Hm. So I go get the thing and holy crap there's a whole repeat of a bunch of the game? Looked at a guide and not sure I can do all that.

Especially every single plant. I was doing that at the start but ran out of seeds one time. Then I also noticed that going through doors and back refreshed health. So I stopped planting near doors through a big chunk of the game. Going to be a pain.

Game was fun but not sure it was great enough to 100%.

I'm recovering from COVID so have had some extra play time while on sick leave. For some reason I chose to play Ghostrunner, which I just finished, probably raising my blood pressure 20 points in the process. It was an exercise in concentrated frustration that would make my experience with Dark Souls green with envy. I'm certain I averaged over one death per minute of gameplay throughout. Without quick reloads and frequent checkpoints, I would have surely rage-quit, and I am a stubborn person when it comes to finishing games.

Besides dying, occasionally I would zip around the environment killing thugs like a badass cyber-ninja.

The environments often looked pretty cool, but felt lifeless. But it's not like you could really gawk at them too much anyway; you had to keep moving. That's one thing the Dark Souls series does well. Although you are frantically fighting for your life most of the time, there are plenty of quiet, reflective moments where you can just kind of look around and appreciate the area you're in, your gear, that bizarre NPC nearby, the state of the world, your life, or whatever. Ghostrunner could have used some moments like this.

Stele wrote:

Finished Death's Door last night. Watched credits today and that final scene... Hm. So I go get the thing and holy crap there's a whole repeat of a bunch of the game? Looked at a guide and not sure I can do all that.

Especially every single plant. I was doing that at the start but ran out of seeds one time. Then I also noticed that going through doors and back refreshed health. So I stopped planting near doors through a big chunk of the game. Going to be a pain.

Game was fun but not sure it was great enough to 100%.

If you aren't going back for that, go look up the ending, especially if you have played Titan Souls and want to see the connection.

Finished Submerged: Hidden Depths this morning. It is essentially the same game as Submerged (2015), which for me is not a bad thing.

While it looks like a 3D platformer, I don't think it is. If feels more like an adventure game where you walk around in 3D environments, finding collectibles. There is no combat. You can't die. (Or, if there is a way to die, I haven't managed to find it. I even tried bumping into the final "boss" with the boat and nothing happened.)

You play as two siblings exploring ruins of an inundated city, going from ruin to ruin on a boat, finding magical seeds so you can resurrect gigantic plants, solving puzzles and finding more collectibles along the way. Unfortunately, you only bring one character in each area (and you don't get to choose which one). It could have been cool to have puzzles where you need both characters to interact (possibly in online co-op).

The music is also relaxing with lots of piano but, to be perfectly honest, this game is very good for podcast listening, and that's mostly what I did while playing it.

The game is pretty short. It took me around 7 hours to complete, with around 90% completion. I'm still missing a few things, and I don't know if I'm going to go back to get them, since the Epic store version doesn't have trophies or achievements. (I did get all the trophies for Submerged when I played it in 2015 on my PS4.)

In short: I liked the game, and it doesn't overstay its welcome.

If you're curious, the game is free on the Epic game store this week. Funnily enough, it first came out for Stadia back in 2020...

I just saw that Submerged: Hidden Depths is free. Epic currently has the first game for $1.99. Picked it up and playing that one first, although I don't know if it's necessary or not.

Just finished up Cult of the Lamb. It's goofy, it's fun, and one of the best games I've played in awhile. I didn't get all the collectibles but did put around 16 hours in before credits rolled.

DeThroned wrote:

I just saw that Submerged: Hidden Depths is free. Epic currently has the first game for $1.99. Picked it up and playing that one first, although I don't know if it's necessary or not.

Not strictly necessary, but Hidden Depths is a direct continuation. I'm not sure it's a good idea to play both games back to back though, since they are so similar.

I picked up a bunch of cheap old stuff during the soon to be over gog sale that I've been dipping into, and from the 0.99 bucket, Tomb Raider: Legend.

It's Crystal Dynamics' first at bat with the franchise, and it's interesting how much they carried over in terms of move set and basic building blocks for the puzzles to the 2013 reboot. It's jankier of course, but so much of it is here already. Except, some naff boss-fights aside, I think I like this better. The lighter, pulpier tone works for me in a way that the overly self-serious current iteration doesn't. And I'm not just saying that because Lara gunfighting in an evening dress also...works...for me in a way the series never has .

Also from 0.99 bucket, I played and finished Daikatana because apparently I hate myself and have no respect for my time.

(Although I did play the fan-patched version with invulnerable companions and quicksave enabled, because I don't hate myself quite that much.)

Anyway, good god. The first episode the most atrocious thing I've played in ages. Staggeringly ugly with tiny enemies that blend into the cramped, claustrophobic, environment, over-designed weapons that will kill you as soon as the enemy. I knew of its reputation as a disaster, but playing it for myself really drove it home. How the hell did anyone think this was acceptable? Especially since it gets almost passable in a subpar Hexen-knockoff kinda way at times in later episodes, with wider spaces, a better arsenal, and levels that aren't entirely puke-green or brown.

Don't do what I did unless you're extremely morbidly curious. This Civvie11 video is an entirely accurate summary of the experience:

Alien Love Gardener wrote:

Also from 0.99 bucket, I played and finished Daikatana because apparently I hate myself and have no respect for my time.

Anyway, good god. The first episode the most atrocious thing I've played in ages. Staggeringly ugly with tiny enemies that blend into the cramped, claustrophobic, environment, over-designed weapons that will kill you as soon as the enemy.

I still remember my one attempt to play this over 20 years ago. First level I was trying to kill mosquitos and frogs (iirc). I never even finished the first stage.

But the real question is: would you pick Daikatana, Duke Nukem Forever, or rather just being nibbled to death by crabs as your desert island game?

Alien Love Gardener wrote:

I picked up a bunch of cheap old stuff during the soon to be over gog sale that I've been dipping into, and from the 0.99 bucket, Tomb Raider: Legend.

It's Crystal Dynamics' first at bat with the franchise, and it's interesting how much they carried over in terms of move set and basic building blocks for the puzzles to the 2013 reboot. It's jankier of course, but so much of it is here already. Except, some naff boss-fights aside, I think I like this better. The lighter, pulpier tone works for me in a way that the overly self-serious current iteration doesn't. And I'm not just saying that because Lara gunfighting in an evening dress also...works...for me in a way the series never has .

Tomb Raider Legend is definitely the highlight of the series for me. Its story is fun, it looks great even 16 years later, I enjoy the exploration and the puzzles, and I like the banter between Lara and her acolytes. I could do without the motorcycle segments, but that's about it.

mrtomaytohead wrote:
Stele wrote:

Finished Death's Door last night. Watched credits today and that final scene... Hm. So I go get the thing and holy crap there's a whole repeat of a bunch of the game? Looked at a guide and not sure I can do all that.

Especially every single plant. I was doing that at the start but ran out of seeds one time. Then I also noticed that going through doors and back refreshed health. So I stopped planting near doors through a big chunk of the game. Going to be a pain.

Game was fun but not sure it was great enough to 100%.

If you aren't going back for that, go look up the ending, especially if you have played Titan Souls and want to see the connection.

I finished Death's Door a couple weeks ago, now. Really enjoyed it, and I liked the post-game content -- the puzzles were really cool and a great way to integrate the things you learned over the course of the game. But I've never played Titan Souls so the actual bonus ending fell flat for me.

Then right after that I finished Unpacking. I didn't love it quite as much as folks on the podcast did. Intellectually, I really enjoyed what it was doing, and how some of the mechanics changed based on who you were moving in with -- or who was moving in with you! But it just didn't resonate with me emotionally in the same way. Tidying up and unpacking doesn't get me going in real life, and so it just didn't feel as fun, here, as I was hoping it might.

Spoiler:

Like when you first move in with roommates, you can't rearrange their stuff. But when you move in with a partner, you can! And then, the situation is reversed, where a partner moves in with you and you need to rearrange the stuff you've already set up to accommodate them

AUs_TBirD wrote:
Alien Love Gardener wrote:

Also from 0.99 bucket, I played and finished Daikatana because apparently I hate myself and have no respect for my time.

Anyway, good god. The first episode the most atrocious thing I've played in ages. Staggeringly ugly with tiny enemies that blend into the cramped, claustrophobic, environment, over-designed weapons that will kill you as soon as the enemy.

I still remember my one attempt to play this over 20 years ago. First level I was trying to kill mosquitos and frogs (iirc). I never even finished the first stage.

But the real question is: would you pick Daikatana, Duke Nukem Forever, or rather just being nibbled to death by crabs as your desert island game?

Yeah, mechanized frogs and mosquitos. It boggles the mind.

I've not actually played DNF, so if I picked that I'd at least have something new, but from what I've heard of it...I think I'll cheat and pick the recently unearthed 2001 DNF build.

Over the past week, I've been playing through Demon's Crest, originally an SNES game, on the Switch's virtual console. I had gotten the "bad" and "normal" endings when I was younger, but never the "good" ending (beat the boss after collecting everything) or the "true" ending (beat the optional superboss).

Demon's Crest is a platformer that's kind of spun off of Ghosts & Goblins or Super Ghouls & Ghosts, and I remember it being really hard. Well, it still is, though I think it's one of those games that's made much easier if you know the optimum path to get the right upgrades at key times -- kind of like a Mega Man game.

But that optional super-boss -- man, that thing was tough. I had to heavily abuse save states to survive and finish him off.

Just finished satellite reign for the second time. Never played the original syndicate so I can't compare it, but I like this game quite a bit. Sneaking in stealing loot and causing chaos is quite fun. I wish the combat and balance was a bit better but well I beat it twice. So that's a mark of approval.

Also, ending spoiler,

Spoiler:

The fact that the title is basically a pun is great.

Dude. Go play Syndicate. It's amazing.

Continuing my journey through assorted stuff I picked up on sale, I finished Tomb Raider: Anniversary, which was Crystal Dynamics' remake of the first one. It was weird playing this, since It's been over 20 years since I played the original. I remembered a surprising amount of it, from cutscene beats to puzzle solutions.

Generally, I'd say it's a pretty successful remake. Just controlling smoothly counts for a hell of a lot. I do think the bosses lose something though. Just bluntly getting a T-Rex coming at you and having to desperately empty all you have into it is a lot more effective than turning it into a quasi puzzle fight with quicktime events.

There's also puzzle stuff that could have done with being remade, from long sequences you can f*ck up at the first jump to instant death traps that require split second timing, and generally I think the later areas never as good as the opening Peru one.

I also finished Norco - which caused me to finally create a list of the games I've played in 2022, because I don't want to forget about this one when it's time for GotY lists. Pixel art adventure game with excellent writing and atmosphere. It's quite an eerily believable portrayal of a climate ravaged and collapsing US - aside from the robots and the magical realism - but it's also quite funny and human at the same time. I couldn't put it down once I started.

I finished Inside in one go last night, which I'm glad to say worked flawlessly with proton on my steam deck.

That is a weird game. Gorgeously crafted, but the ending really threw off the experience for me so I'm a bit puzzled as to how I feel about the experience as a whole. It's weird when its a game you are glad you played but also glad it was only a few hours. I guess that means I liked it even though I didn't like it enough to play it more... so does that mean I didn't like it that much? Dunno I'm probably overthinking this

Hey, I'm currently wishing Assassin's Creed: Valhalla ended 80 hours ago. Any game that's just as long as it needs to be is way ahead in my book.

Evan E wrote:

Hey, I'm currently wishing Assassin's Creed: Valhalla ended 80 hours ago. Any game that's just as long as it needs to be is way ahead in my book.

Every time I think about finally trying an Assassin's Creed game, I see a post like this and it reminds me to just steer clear.

I finished two games this weekend.

First up was Kingdom Hearts Re:Chain of Memories. In some ways I'm surprised I got through even the first half, nevermind the whole thing. The battle system is poorly explained so it feels really hard. After doing some googling, you learn how to break it so it becomes trivially easy, so it goes faster, but still isn't all that interesting, exactly. Nevertheless, the story was interesting enough to carry me through, and now I'm just about ready to start Kingdom Hearts 2 when the mood strikes.

Second was Fashion Police Squad. This is a boomer shooter with a delightful aesthetic where you're solving fashion crimes at the point of a gun. I found it pretty challenging in the second half, but luckily they patched in the ability to change your difficulty mid-game so I was able to get to the end. This has some hilarious boss battles, wonderful writing, and doesn't stay past its welcome. I don't play too many first person shooters these days so it was also a nice change of pace in that regard.

I'm continuing to fill the gap in my gaming experience that is the Resident Evil series and just finished Resident Evil 2 Remake. Obviously, the gameplay was much improved over the antiquated HD Remaster and RE Zero. Atmosphere and graphics were top notch. The devs did a splendid job of balancing periods of tense exploration with running for your life. Ammo was scarce, but I never found myself in the no win situation of being completely out. No eye-rolling plot or character moments that abounded in RE Zero especially.

So, great time all around. As soon as I finished, I immediately played through as the second character.

Looking forward to continuing and getting to the modern ones, but since they're giving RE 4 the remake treatment as well, I'll slow down so I can play that one in order.

Finished The Suffering.

That was a PS2-era shooter alright, but sometimes that's exactly what I'm in the mood for. Can't say it was very effective as a horror game, but I did enjoy the designs, especially when they tipped over into more Hellraiser territory. It had some dodgy setpieces and bosses, and an annoying tendency towards freezing that got worse towards the end, but I'm still looking forward to getting started with the sequel.

Praise be to the Emperor!!

I just finished Warhammer 40K: Inquisitor - Martyr and the Prophecy DLC (which is pretty much required to truly finish the main story).

Man this game was a Warhammer 40K hamburger cooked bloody rare, on a 40K keto bun smothered in 40K hot sauce. This game just oozed the Imperium theme to a very necessary extreme. Deep bass overtones. Massive gothic structures. Everyone speaking in gravitas-filled pseudo-British accents, dropping sentences in 40K quasi-Latin with words like "teleportarium" "adeptus mechanicus" "Omnissiah" and my favorite "librarium". Giant guns blasting apart Xenos to the point where you could feel the chunks and gibs and gore smattering your screen as you blew apart hordes and hordes and hordes of enemies.

And of course, Chainswords.

In short, the comparison that's usually made for this game is that Warhammer 40K Inquisitor - Martyr is basically Diablo in the Warhammer 40K universe. It's an action RPG in 40K. and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. But if you think Diablo takes the grimdark setting to an extreme, Inquisitor says "hold my amasec, brewed by the finest apothecaries from the Caligari sector" and turns the gothic dial to 11. There's actually no other way 40K could...or should...approach their setting other than "all in". If there's one word that does not apply to the Imperium, it is "subtle". Even then, they would change it to something like "subtlearium".

I knew what I was getting into when I started this game. Coincidentally, I just started reading the Eisenhorn series of 40K novels at the time I installed Inquisitor, so I was fully invested already. What I did not expect was how much of a well structured and designed game this was going to be.

Gameplay wise, if you've played Diablo or any ARPG, you've played a version of this game. So why bother installing Inquisitor? Actually a few reasons. The game is well polished at this point. Other than a few voiceover mispronunciations (or at least inconsistency in pronunciations for the fake Latin words) it was well voiced, and the sound and audiovisual themes were very immersive. The game also ran incredibly smoothly, especially when dozens of horde creatures were on the screen. The weapons and armor were sufficiently varied that you could mix and match gameplay styles and weapon choices to your heart's desire. The gameplay was mission based, so you can have a quick 20 minute session without feeling the need to invest hours into a level. The different classes and subclasses in the game allowed you to not only tailor your style of gameplay, but also it will let you take a unique strategy into each mission. For some missions, playing as a Crusader (basically the Inquisition's form of a Space Marine mixed with Diablo 3's Crusader), I ripped through hordes of enemies with my 2-handed Eviscerator relic chain sword. Other times, the only way to purge abominations was to unleash my heavy flamer and turn an entire level into a hellscape of smoldering heresy. Then there were those instances where I would grab my enormous bulky 2-handed heavy bolter and turn enemy armies into a mountain of ground beef that had sinned against the Emperor. It was really, really satisfying.

And get this: it had...a really good multichapter story! With a journal that does a great job summarizing key points so you can come back and not feel lost on what you were doing and why. And the characters and NPC actually had personality and their own motivations. I was totally expecting nothing but "slash shoot and purge". I didn't expect "read and reflect" to be verbs in this game.

The only minor gripes I have are (i), as expected with any ARPG, at times the gameplay and setting does get repetitive - "Oh, kill 200 monsters in an enormous gothic structure? BEEN THERE", (ii) the skill set progression was a bit awkward at times, and perhaps the most unforgiveable sin:

Spoiler:

NO ORKS!

But otherwise the pros far, far outweighed the cons.

So, yes, if you're looking to wear 900 pound power armor while wielding a gun larger than your torso to utterly turn an army of enemies into meat salad, do not hesitate to pick up Inquisitor Martyr and the essential Prophecy DLC as well. If the above does not sound appealing, you can also play as an assassin (basically sword swinging lady space ninja or a sniper), psycher (aka space wizard), or tech-adept (aka Space engineer). All the classes play very well with unique styles and strategies. But I chose Crusader because, well...40K.

Up next, time to say "FOR THE EMPEROR!" once again, but this time for Karl Franz in Total War: Warhammer 3 - Immortal Empires. Or maybe I'll just chill out with a Tropico game or Necrobarista.

Then again: Gothic Armada and Mechanicus might pull me back in...

As I was reading Budo's piece, a vision was coming into mind.

"Total War: Warhammer 40k."

You're welcome, Creative Assembly.

davet010 wrote:

As I was reading Budo's piece, a vision was coming into mind.

"Total War: Warhammer 40k."

You're welcome, Creative Assembly.

I mean, the Dawn of War series kind of scratches that itch, but yeah totally. Or maybe an XCOM2 version.

Budo wrote:
davet010 wrote:

As I was reading Budo's piece, a vision was coming into mind.

"Total War: Warhammer 40k."

You're welcome, Creative Assembly.

I mean, the Dawn of War series kind of scratches that itch, but yeah totally. Or maybe an XCOM2 version.

Like Chaos Gate: Daemonhunters?

Yup, that's on my wishlist...

Budo I am just delighted and tickled that you like Inquisitor so much. It's just such a wonderful game that scratches so many of my itches.

Veloxi wrote:

Budo I am just delighted and tickled that you like Inquisitor so much. It's just such a wonderful game that scratches so many of my itches.

Which one is the good one? I just started and I haven't gotten very far because I'm really so bored. Martyr is the base, and Inquisitor is the expansion?

Natus wrote:
Veloxi wrote:

Budo I am just delighted and tickled that you like Inquisitor so much. It's just such a wonderful game that scratches so many of my itches.

Which one is the good one? I just started and I haven't gotten very far because I'm really so bored. Martyr is the base, and Inquisitor is the expansion?

Inquisitor - Martyr is the base game, and Prophecy is the DLC. It's not much of an expansion to be honest, just a few more multi-mission story arcs, but it does complete the main campaign.

BTW I totally get if Inquisitor doesn't click for you. IMO, 40K games can be hit or miss, but when they hit, they HIT. Also I've found over the years that you really need to be in the mood to play a 40K game. It's not something you just pick up at random. Rather you actively decide to play the setting.

If it's not clicking with you, I wouldn't push it and force yourself to like the game. As I was joking about earlier, the setting is heavy and weighs on you intentionally. Wait until you're in the mood. But overall yeah I found Inquisitor to be one of the "good ones"

Also, play around with the other classes and weapon combos. For me Crusader with the Eviscerator, heavy bolter and flamer were perfect choices. I bounced off of a lot of the other weapons, and if I had started with those weapons that I had found less appealing and not tried the others I ended up preferring, yeah there's a strong chance that I would have bounced off of the game early too. The Assassin class is fun if you just want to slide through enemies in groups or pick them off at a distance. The Psyker and Tech Adept were ok, but I rarely play those classes in any game or genre.