Dwarf Fortress you sick temptress, you!

On my third or fourth fortress at this point having never played the game prior to the Steam release. I'd play a few hours, decide I could do some things better and then start over. I was real happy with this fortress, but just had my first siege at ~2 years in with a population of 24. I'd mostly neglected military other than a group of 3 axedwarfs.

I lost 9 dwarves in the siege, one of whom was my doctor, which is a problem given that one of the fighters survived but I assume won't live through the medical 'treatment' he's currently receiving. I think I'll keep going with this one to see how trying to recover goes.

Siege defense is pretty simple in vanilla DF. Construct a bunch of doors which, if barred, force invaders to walk a gauntlet of traps. Link those doors to a single lever. Define a burrow well behind the doors and make sure your lever is inside that burrow. Be sure the "source materials from outside the burrow" option is OFF. Start with stone-fall traps and replace those weapon traps as you craft tool components (my favorite trap component is the large serrated metal disc).

When a siege begins, assign all your citizens to the burrow, pull the lever, and put your soldiers at the end of the gauntlet. Manually cancel all current jobs from the Citizens Information Menu to make sure your dwarves aren't trying to do any tasks outside the burrow. Then you wait for the invaders to kill themselves. As long as you keep adding traps, it's unlikely that a siege will make it all the way through your gauntlet. The invaders will flee when enough of their attackers are killed.

In this layout you'll also see a bridge that I've added to provide protection to merchants if I have a caravan visiting when invaders attack. The bridge is hooked up to a separate lever. (The ballista haven't proved useful so far.)

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/fuDpJyV.png)

Oops, I had to remove the weapon traps in front of the bridge, they made my depot inaccessible to caravans.

100+ goblins invade, looking for artifacts.

They're not having a great time of it.

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/6QPenLY.png)

Aftermath: Lost 1 dwarf.

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/SUrZJhO.png)

If I had to redo my fortress, I would make the final leg of the gauntlet much longer and inline with a ballista, so I could pop open the doors and immediately fire a giant ballista bolt down the hallway before sending in my dwarves.

That method of defense just isn't quite satisfying enough.

Of all the many dozens I tried over the years, none could compare to The One.

Also, good lord that was 15 years ago. Game's got legs, don't she?

Current fort has seen some fun things.

One was an early migrant wave from 27 to 76 Dorfs - but 23 of the new arrivals were children.

And now I dealing with my first weresloth infestation and it is a struggle - this may be the end for this one. I'm getting much better at organising things though.

My "safe" adamantine mining is very slow going. I haven't even reached the adamantine layer yet.

I figured mining from above using channels would be safe and it's... safer, but not safe. Miners have a tendency to walk down into the channel they just mined, which often fill with magma a tick later. Because dwarves are stupid. They sometimes do this even when I have them assigned to a burrow which forbids them from going down into the channel.

When the channel releases a scary monster, the miner is the nearest target. Sometimes the miner will even attack instead of fleeing. The problem is that it's impossible to make a miner wear armor while they're mining because there's a hardcoded "uniform" for miners that replaces their outfit even if the miner is in a military squad and assigned a set of armor.

So I have to babysit and micromanage the whole process and it's tedious. But I don't really have a goal in my game other then to get more adamantine and outfit my soldiers with it.

So I've learned that if you set your soldiers uniform to "Uniform worn over clothing" then they will never wear metal boots, they will instead wear civilian footwear even when training or on duty.

Clash of the titans! The fire breathing one prevailed but set everything around it on fire.

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/onN5WFt.png)

I've lost 7 miners to accidents and fiends. But I've also outfitted a squad of 10 dwarves with adamantine breastplates and adamantine or "divine metal" weapons. The latter are artifacts that can be found in hidden caches deep underground. They're worth almost 10 times the finest quality adamantine weapon.

Wait, Dwarf Fortress is part of the MCU now?

Adamant was a legendary mineral in Greek mythology that was said to be unbreakable. Adamantine and adamantium both derive from it.

Also:

Pretty sure "adamas" was Greek for diamond?

Since I last posted in this thread, I've put about 100 hours into Rimworld and have very much gone down the colony-building rabbit hole. I've decided to take another stab at Dwarf Fortress, and I think my Rimworld experience is both a big help and a bit of a barrier as I keep trying to compare the two games 1:1 when they are clearly very different beasts.

I decided to put down the $40 AUD down on the Steam release because it the UI is a lot more accessible and the Steam Workshop integration is really nice.

I've spent about 6 hours trying out different things and feel pretty comfortable setting up a little farm, a few rooms, and a place for my Dwarfs to meet up and drink. That's huge progress for me, because I couldn't do anything last time I tried! Yay! I mostly followed along with a tutorial series by someone on YouTube called Blind, he explained things so well.

A few things I'm currently struggling with though...

1. Already had a dwarf go totally mad and out of control. I couldn't figure out why this happened - I think I didn't have a temple for them to pray at, but I'm not sure how to read my Dwarfs needs (something that's SUPER clear in Rimworld).

2. Whenever I set up a work order, there are SO MANY options for different types of metal/stone that I get overwhelmed. I've just been defaulting to "make rock X" and getting them to pick whatever is closest. Does it really matter?

3. When does the fun (?) start happening? I enjoy making efficient little layouts and figuring things out, but should I expect events to start occurring (e.g, Rimworld often has raiders attacking you, sudden weather changes ruining crops, animals turning mad and running into your base etc.). After I'm set up with food/seeds and everyone has a bedroom, I'm just not sure what I should be doing because nothing has required me to adapt yet.

4. Am I supposed to get to know my Dwarves? In Rimworld, there are far less colonists (4-15) compared to this where it looks like you can easily get 100+. I find it hard to track even the beginning party because they move around so quickly. I really love how the story of each colonist in Rimworld develops over time and builds a mental picture of who they are It'd be nice if I could do the same here!

Sorry if this is all Rimworld comparisons, but it's a new thing for me and it's easy to base my expectations on familiarity keen to keep learning!

1. Don't remember of the top of my head but there's a view tile button then let's you see a dwarfs details. Usually with complaints about stuff they are missing. Enough of those and they can break.

2. This doesn't matter except for a few odd cases. More valuable stones are worth more. Making things of wood means they can burn but are lighter. So wooden doors open faster. Elves don't like stuff made from animals. Etc. Most of the time I just ignore it and use whatever is close

3. Rimworld's addition of the storyteller was a great improvement that other games don't really have. In dwarf fortress it's possible to set yourself up so there's no real danger. No attacks, or enemies nearby. Only after you fortress gets a certain amount of wealth raiders start occurring. Or when nobles show up and start making demands. Most of the stories you read are usually due to someone purely playing in a tough area or random chance. You have to make you're own story.

4. I actually tweak my game to have a smaller max population limit. I dislike the large number of dwarves. You can get to know them but it is much harder then Rimworld which had it built in mind. Usually you just have one or two favorites for me.

Rimworld is very much a evolution of the dwarf fortress. So you'll definitely feel stuff missing when switching.

If I were going to guess I would guess that your dwarf went mad because they went into a mood and wanted to make something but you didn't have a key component they wanted. It was probably a shell they needed. It has been the downfall of many a new player.
Dwarfs really really want to make the thing when they get in the mood.

master0 wrote:

1. Don't remember of the top of my head but there's a view tile button then let's you see a dwarfs details. Usually with complaints about stuff they are missing. Enough of those and they can break.

2. This doesn't matter except for a few odd cases. More valuable stones are worth more. Making things of wood means they can burn but are lighter. So wooden doors open faster. Elves don't like stuff made from animals. Etc. Most of the time I just ignore it and use whatever is close

3. Rimworld's addition of the storyteller was a great improvement that other games don't really have. In dwarf fortress it's possible to set yourself up so there's no real danger. No attacks, or enemies nearby. Only after you fortress gets a certain amount of wealth raiders start occurring. Or when nobles show up and start making demands. Most of the stories you read are usually due to someone purely playing in a tough area or random chance. You have to make you're own story.

4. I actually tweak my game to have a smaller max population limit. I dislike the large number of dwarves. You can get to know them but it is much harder then Rimworld which had it built in mind. Usually you just have one or two favorites for me.

Rimworld is very much a evolution of the dwarf fortress. So you'll definitely feel stuff missing when switching.

This is incredibly helpful, thank you! It's also great perspective for me comparing the two games. I can see that Rimworld is much "gamier", but am fascinated by the simulation aspects of Dwarf Fortress.

Dwarfs really really want to make the thing when they get in the mood.

Noted! . I'll have to duck back into my fort to see if I can figure this one out! Something I really appreciate in Rimworld is that if a pawn has a mental break, you'll have a short history with the line "X is suffering a mental break. The last straw: Ate poor meal" or something.

In terms of progress, this is what I've done so far. I'd love some pointers for what to learn next:

1. Strike the Earth! I dig until I see stone (i.e not clay/sand etc.)
2. Set up a large store room to unpack cart
3. Plant plump helmets on upper levels
4. Stone crafter + carpenter for furniture
5. Assign bookkeeper, manager etc. to start work orders
6. Build a tavern, start brewing plump helmets
7. Dorm/bedrooms
8. Temple
9. Have 1 dwarf cutting gems in preparation for traders
10. Get utterly lost and now know what to build next

Overall it's a fascinating experience. I'm so thankful for the new graphics making it all so much more readable. One day I'll try out the classic ASCII mode (when I'm not struggling with everything else!)

You are at roughly the same place that I tend to get distracted and bored with the lack of game-specified goals and move on. However, this Industry Flowchart might help you with moving beyond self-sustaining and into more intricate stuff. In addition to crafting more stuff to decorate with or sell, now is the time to start building your defenses and forming your militia. Eventually some kind of monsters will start to attack you, and you'll want to be ready for trouble. Also, you can always dig deeper...

A_Unicycle wrote:

3. When does the fun (?) start happening? I enjoy making efficient little layouts and figuring things out, but should I expect events to start occurring (e.g, Rimworld often has raiders attacking you, sudden weather changes ruining crops, animals turning mad and running into your base etc.). After I'm set up with food/seeds and everyone has a bedroom, I'm just not sure what I should be doing because nothing has required me to adapt yet.

A lot of the events are tied to the wealth of your fortress, so if you keep churning out crafts eventually you'll end up with someone who's making staggeringly valuable masterpieces and then some people are going to show up and try to steal your legendary socks.

Alternately, if you're ever lost for something to do or your fort feels too stable and you want to trigger some excitement, just start digging deeper. Even just finding a mushroom forest layer will give you some creatures to sort out and if that proves to be too comfortable... continue digging deeper.

A_Unicycle wrote:

In terms of progress, this is what I've done so far. I'd love some pointers for what to learn next:

1. Strike the Earth! I dig until I see stone (i.e not clay/sand etc.)
2. Set up a large store room to unpack cart
3. Plant plump helmets on upper levels
4. Stone crafter + carpenter for furniture
5. Assign bookkeeper, manager etc. to start work orders
6. Build a tavern, start brewing plump helmets
7. Dorm/bedrooms
8. Temple
9. Have 1 dwarf cutting gems in preparation for traders
10. Get utterly lost and now know what to build next

Overall it's a fascinating experience. I'm so thankful for the new graphics making it all so much more readable. One day I'll try out the classic ASCII mode (when I'm not struggling with everything else!)

A good intermediate goal I like to try for is a steel industry and using that to build an effective military.
This links up with some of the ideas about digging being offered above.

I am having trouble linking a lever to a floodgate. I have mechanisms, and the floodgate is accessible (from one orthogonal side). I have googled to try and resolve this, but the wiki isn't helping me. The "link lever" UI will let me link to a random door, but gives me an orange "cannot link to blah wood floodgate". Any ideas?

DudleySmith wrote:

I am having trouble linking a lever to a floodgate. I have mechanisms, and the floodgate is accessible (from one orthogonal side). I have googled to try and resolve this, but the wiki isn't helping me. The "link lever" UI will let me link to a random door, but gives me an orange "cannot link to blah wood floodgate". Any ideas?

Try unbuilding the lever, rebuilding it and linking them, or viceversa, unbuild the floodgate, rebuild, link.

Also, inspect the floodgate just in case, is there anything else on its tile?

Your dwarf might not be able to link it from the accessible side and could think that there's a particular side it needs to be linked to.

A_Unicycle wrote:

In terms of progress, this is what I've done so far. I'd love some pointers for what to learn next:

1. Strike the Earth! I dig until I see stone (i.e not clay/sand etc.)
2. Set up a large store room to unpack cart
3. Plant plump helmets on upper levels
4. Stone crafter + carpenter for furniture
5. Assign bookkeeper, manager etc. to start work orders
6. Build a tavern, start brewing plump helmets
7. Dorm/bedrooms
8. Temple
9. Have 1 dwarf cutting gems in preparation for traders
10. Get utterly lost and now know what to build next

You have described me DW experience to a T. I get a little further than that, but not much. I've started at least 10 fortresses at this point. I've only lost 1 and the rest I just quit. I would step away from the game for a bit then have no idea what I was doing when I came back and start over. Rinse, repeat.

I'm about to start yet another fortress.

-BEP

Are oval-ish or rounded off rectangle-ish rooms more appealing to dwarves?

-BEP

bepnewt wrote:

Are oval-ish or rounded off rectangle-ish rooms more appealing to dwarves?

-BEP

My reading is that they are indifferent to the shape of the room. Size is all that matters. (fnar)

Bruce wrote:
bepnewt wrote:

Are oval-ish or rounded off rectangle-ish rooms more appealing to dwarves?

-BEP

My reading is that they are indifferent to the shape of the room. Size is all that matters. (fnar)

Appreciate it!

-BEP

Adventure mode has a release window now.