Irish company claims to have "Free Energy"

I love stuff like this.

Steorn took out an ad in the economist because they think they've got a perpetual motion machine that really works.

In the .000001 percent out come, its howdy doody time.

In all the other outcomes, what a great marketing ploy to sell the services of a marketing company.

It has to be said, they're drunk right?

There are HUNDREDS of patents on PMM's. None of them work.

I watched the video. Apparently as long as the laws of physics don't apply to them, they'll be able to make self-charging cell phones. Seems pretty simple (shrug).

IMAGE(http://rps.net/QS/Images/brilliant.jpg)

Quintin_Stone wrote:

*Guinness pic*

Quin wins the thread. I can say nothing that would top that.

In this house lisa, we obey the second law of thermodynamics....

I smell either a spoof or a vaporware enterprise. Either way, they put a lot of effort into the website.

Execept for the stupid "Steorn is a word translating as 'to guide, direct and manage'." we're so Oirish.. give us money bit.

Morrolan wrote:

There are HUNDREDS of patents on PMM's. None of them work.

Are there? I thought the USPO wouldn't even look at applications for PMM patents.

Given my Irish brethren's history of scientific achievement, I predict that it won't end well...

"Today we, Ireland's top scientists, have found a way to convert our entire population to pure energy!"

"It's a glorious day."

"Michael McCloud's just invented a new kind of beverage in his basement. Whiskey..."

LiquidMantis wrote:
Morrolan wrote:

There are HUNDREDS of patents on PMM's. None of them work.

Are there? I thought the USPO wouldn't even look at applications for PMM patents.

I think all they have to do is not actually use the phrase "perpetual motion."

I really hope its a spoof actually, it would be much less sad.

Morrolan wrote:
LiquidMantis wrote:
Morrolan wrote:

There are HUNDREDS of patents on PMM's. None of them work.

Are there? I thought the USPO wouldn't even look at applications for PMM patents.

I think all they have to do is not actually use the phrase "perpetual motion."

They won't take patents on PMM's themselves, so to get around that they apply for patents on all the individual parts that make up their supposed PMM.

Rat Boy wrote:

Given my Irish brethren's history of scientific achievement, I predict that it won't end well...

"Today we, Ireland's top scientists, have found a way to convert our entire population to pure energy!"

"It's a glorious day."

"Michael McCloud's just invented a new kind of beverage in his basement. Whiskey..."

(I just found a downloaded .avi of that episode. Golden. )

Hold the phone, people. Now there's an interesting possibility.

John Titor CommentTime1 hour ago edited
I told you I would be back when the device that harnessed the power of a singularity was revealed. Though this device is magnetically based, it will lead the way to the magnetic containment field that will harness the power about which wrote on your August 20, 2001 (exactly five years to the day). You are now ready for the next step in your evolution; as this device will bring you closer to the cataclysm that reshapes mankind.

-JT

Posted in the steorn forum. Titor is back baby! The t-man returns! Yea my jaded the cup is half empty self says hoax.

Yeah as Rat Boy's link suggests this might be viral marketing for Halo 3. I loved I love bees.

I would LOVE it if this was Halo3 marketing. Frakin' brilliant.

Gah, but deeper into the thread on EvAv there's a lot of evidence against it being viral marketing. Weird how TeamXbox.com posted it though... Oh well, wait and see I guess. I'm really in the mood for some ARGing!

I'm dubious, because they say they've had the results for "years", and yet back in May they were pushing their solution for extended charge batteries via...microgenerators. If they'd had free energy stuff, they'd not have bothered, I would think.

If this is viral marketing for Halo 3, I'm agreeing with rabbit.

rabbit wrote:

Frakin' brilliant.

Does Halo 3 really need viral marketing? I thought that was what fanboys were for.

Steorn still says that "...following validation..." great things will happen. Right. Bring it out and demo it, people, or stfu!

Yeah I want to see it actually powering something...

My work here is done. I may now return to my home planet.

Arise, thread, and walk under your own power without any external source!

Looks like Steorn is offering two products powered by it's technology in the very near future - a phone, and a phone charger. I have to admit I'm gobsmacked that they would do this.

If they don't deliver, then it's fraud and they are looking at serious consequences.

Boing Boing wrote:

What makes this episode different from each of Steorn's previous adventures is that for the first time they are making Orbo-powered products available to the public, to be put to long-term use, tested, and torn apart. Their first products are clunky, impractical and overpriced: the 1200 euros phone charger is to be followed in early 2016 by a 480 euros retro-style non-smart cell phone that never needs charging. Later offerings will include an e-cigarette and a wireless game controller. But the impracticality of this motley collection of devices is beside the point: Steorn wants to get Orbo into as many people's hands as possible, so they won't need the blessing of academic science. People will find out for themselves that Orbo works, and proclaim it over and over on the internet, until the rumble is loud enough that scientists have to take it seriously, and manufacturers want to license it. Then Steorn can leave product development to others, while they focus on lowering the cost and improving the energy density of their core technology. Eventually, Orbo will power every phone, every car, maybe even everything. That seems to be Steorn's hope, anyway.

To pull this off, they just have one final hurdle to prove they can overcome: the law of conservation of energy, one of the most basic building blocks of modern physics. Conservation isn't just a pattern that's been seen experimentally again and again; it's the mathematical foundation from which much of physics is derived. For example, conservation has caused physicists to hypothesize the necessity of new, never-before-seen subatomic particles, and the existence of these particles was later confirmed experimentally. Some would say that violation of the law of conservation of energy is unthinkable, because if it didn't work, then all of the electronics and other technology we've built on the back of our understanding of physics wouldn't work either. Then again, paradigms do change in science, and classical Newtonian mechanics fit nearly all the experimental data and formed the basis of a lot of successful science, before being replaced by a more complete understanding in the form of relativity. Overturning science is an extremely high bar for Steorn to vault, but it's not necessarily impossible.

The fact that Steorn is able to continue to get investment funding should put the nail in the coffin that people who got wealthy got that way because of their intelligence.

I remember vaguely hearing about this back when they originally announced their "discovery". I can't believe these jokers are still around.

They've done public tests of the thing. Big question for me is what happens 3 weeks or 3 months after the device is first used. Is there a battery inside that wears out?

It baffles me that they are trying to sell this if it does not work. Surely they understand fraud laws... But if it does work? That's head-exploding stuff.

You guys are going to love this article...

Dublin Inquirer wrote:

Professor Sir Eric Ash, a fellow of the Royal Society, the Royal Academy of Engineering and the Institution of Engineering and Technology, wrote a piece for the BBC’s website about McCarthy. He said he believed “that Mr McCarthy is truly convinced of the validity of his invention. It is, in my view, a case of prolonged self-deception.”

When this point is put to McCarthy, he reacts as though it’s not the first time he’s heard that kind of thing said about him.

“Look, people have been saying that sort of thing an awful lot and for an awful long time,” said McCarthy. “I can’t argue the science with people like that. I started off as an engineer in the oil industry and we just fell across this thing. But you look at what’s happening with the Large Hadron Collider over in CERN. That’s €8 billion just to explain gravity. They are looking for the Higgs Boson and stuff like that. The best scientists in the world trying to explain the start of the world and where gravity came from.

“Now if you ask an engineer to make you a bouncy ball, when that ball bounces – that’s gravity in action. The engineer doesn’t understand it but he utilises it. We are in the same situation. I think what might be happening is that we are splitting time. I know that sounds absolutely nuts but I think that we are using the differences in the magnetic fields to manipulate time and that is leading to the creation of energy.”

So magnetic fields are distorting time to create energy. Sure, why not? Let's go with that. It sounds like a throwaway line in a Star Trek episode to explain something that doesn't exist.