360 on a Standard Defintion TV

yeah so i dont have a HDTV monitor, in fact, my TV is so old school it doesn't even do 480p. it's a standard def Sharp 3:4 32" CRT.

it does, however, have component inputs so that's what i've been using with the HD component cable that came with the 360 (setting the little switch to 'standard defnition').

http://www.xbox.com/en-US/support/sy...

this is apparently not advisable according to the cable manual. apparently they want you to use the composite connector for the standard def. TV.

and according my recent help chat over the xbox website, she claims a S-video connector would actually generate a better picture quality on my standard def. TV (better than the component outputs? wtf?)

any thoughts?

i think i may have found the answer to my own question..

http://features.teamxbox.com/xbox/12...

22. If I put a high definition AV cable on my TV would I get the same viewing experience as if I put the regular A/V cord or will the HD AV cable be better?

No matter which type of TV you have, component video cables will always be better than standard composite video. If you have an HDTV, then the HD AV cable is a requirement for you to enjoy 720p. However, if you have a regular TV with component inputs, Xbox 360 will play content in standard 480p but you'll definitely receive a better picture using component video instead of composite.

n fact, my TV is so old school it doesn't even do 480p...it does, however, have component inputs

I think composite inputs means it will do at least 480p.

Dr.Ghastly wrote:

I think composite inputs means it will do at least 480p.

Well, no. For one, Composite is the standard yellow video cable that people were using back when the SNES came out.

Component is what most TV's tend to use for their HD hookups, which is the red, blue, and green set of RCA connectors.

Anyway, standard definition TV's do 480i, regardless of what inputs they have. That's just the way it is. The advantages of using component inputs on a standard TV are all related to things like overall picture clarity, color representation, dot crawl, and a number of other things.

I ran my regular Xbox through component inputs on an SDTV for a couple of years and it definitely looked better than it did when I plugged it in with the old-school composite video cable. But turning on 480p in the Xbox dashboard definitely didn't work

Oooo my bad. ComPONENT is 480p, not composite.

Thin_j is correct and I am a n00b.

Component CAN DO 480p. But only on an EDTV/HDTV.

It's still 480i on a regular TV.

I don't know why I didn't type it that way last time. I guess I was feeling wordy.

Thin_J wrote:

Component CAN DO 480p. But only on an EDTV/HDTV.

It's still 480i on a regular TV.

I don't know why I didn't type it that way last time. I guess I was feeling wordy.

Are you sure about that? I could have sworn my X360 (currently just hooked up via component to an old Sony Wega 27") tells me that it's displaying in 480p.

Tyrian wrote:

Are you sure about that? I could have sworn my X360 (currently just hooked up via component to an old Sony Wega 27") tells me that it's displaying in 480p.

As far as I know, that's the way it works. I claim no real expertise in this other than spending way too much time looking up details on TV's and various other things a while back at places like AVSForums.

I won't say I can't be wrong.

What's the model number on your TV?

*edited twice, for brevity*

Here's the wikipedia description of 480p:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/480p

Having component input does not guarentee ED/HD (480p+) support. As Thin_J noted however, you'll get the best picture quality with it by far compared to s-video or composite. It all has to do with seperating out the varying elements of the picture instead of cramming them all into one pathway with limited bandwidth as composite does. The more seperate the picture elements are, the better the quality is overall.

I asked an expert, and he agrees with you, Thin.

He went into describing the basic differences between composite, component, s-video, etc. Then he began to go into the reasons for this similarity (old TV was black and white, only needed control was brightness).

Sorry for the confusion! My memory just ain't what it used to be!

Asz wrote:

Having component input does not guarentee ED/HD (480p+) support.

Yeah, that would be relative to whatever device you were hooking up to said ED/HD TV.

Glad we got it all cleared up, and I'm also glad I'm not misinformed.

Wee!

Semi-related question for anyone still watching this thread: What is the difference between EDTV and HDTV?

Demiurge wrote:

Semi-related question for anyone still watching this thread: What is the difference between EDTV and HDTV?

As I understand it EDTV is an upsampled video picture so it isn't true HDTV.

As I understand it EDTV is an upsampled video picture so it isn't true HDTV.

EDTV is basically 480p. It's a progressive scan signal, but is the same resolution as standard tv. It doesn't offer the higher resolutions of HDTV (720p, 1080i|p).

Tyrian wrote:
As I understand it EDTV is an upsampled video picture so it isn't true HDTV.

EDTV is basically 480p. It's a progressive scan signal, but is the same resolution as standard tv. It doesn't offer the higher resolutions of HDTV (720p, 1080i|p).

Once again I stand corrected. I thought I read that it was an upsampled 480i.

I think I need to just shut up when it comes to this stuff

Dr.Ghastly wrote:
Tyrian wrote:
As I understand it EDTV is an upsampled video picture so it isn't true HDTV.

EDTV is basically 480p. It's a progressive scan signal, but is the same resolution as standard tv. It doesn't offer the higher resolutions of HDTV (720p, 1080i|p).

Once again I stand corrected. I thought I read that it was an upsampled 480i.

I think I need to just shut up when it comes to this stuff ;)

You're not alone. I like to think I know a little something... but I'm woefully ignorant. Give it 10 minutes, GG, or someone will come in here and correct me.