IT Training

I found out our IT Department has some credits available here and I'm to find a MS course I want to take.

The MCSE upgrades (292/296) aren't done in our area but they have a VB .Net course.

I'm not nor do I desire to be a programmer. I went to college for it and then realized halfway through that it's not what I wanted to do. I do and am trying to become a better scripter and advance past the batch file stage (not that .bat's don't have their place for quick&dirty solutions) and I've hacked together two VBScripts already but have no other VB training.
So here's my question(s):
How much would a VB .Net course help someone like myself?
Does VB .Net differ from VBScript? I'm guessing it's just a version moniker (instead of VB4.3 or VB6).

If that's not the course for me there's a Programming MS SQL course that I can take, since I'm the SMS administrator I suppose it'd be nice to know how to directly query the SMS SQL server once in a while.

Thanks!

Well, it's somewhat blind leading the blind, but as far as I know, VB.net is going to be more featured and obviously more application-oriented than VBS. Until there's an update for WSH that supports C#, I'd say focus on VBS. VB.net training is only going to loosely help your scripting abilities.

LiquidMantis wrote:

Well, it's somewhat blind leading the blind, but as far as I know, VB.net is going to be more featured and obviously more application-oriented than VBS. Until there's an update for WSH that supports C#, I'd say focus on VBS. VB.net training is only going to loosely help your scripting abilities.

See and with Vista going PowerShell or whatever the new script host will be named, I'm wary of even getting too much into VBS. I've seen PS scripts that do in 10 lines what a 50 line VBScript can pull off.

Thanks for the input though LM.

Well, don't forget that it's going to be quite some time before Vista is the predominant workstation OS. I don't know even know that XP has that title yet. Just like the venerable batch file being a way to get things done, VBScript will be useful for a long time when you need something to work across all workstations.

Of course maybe there'll be an update for pre-Vista OSs as well though. Are you talking about Nomad?

LiquidMantis wrote:

Of course maybe there'll be an update for pre-Vista OSs as well though. Are you talking about Nomad?

I think it was called Monad but yes, it's official name is Powershell though you're right it's only for XPSP2 and higher. PS Blog Link.

And I'm not giving up on VBScript per se it's just I don't want to invest any deep learning into it as I seem to manage OK figuring out logic or copying code snippets here and there to get what I need done. I've also got the MS Win2K Script and Scripting for WMI books which are VBS oriented.

Oh right, Mo' 'nads. I watched a Channel 9 video on it a while back and it looks really impressive. I trialed one of the earlier releases but it was still slow, haven't tried it in some time though.

VB.NET is a pretty powerful language, it's advanced considerably from the previous versions. I'd say if you want to be ready for future scripting/programming needs, take the course. You'll probably learn more than what's necessary for scripting jobs, but that's a bonus - it's better to know more than less.

The reasons for taking a VB.NET course, IMO, have nothing to do with language and everything to do with learning your way around the .NET Framework. After you do that, language doesn't matter, as long as it compiles to... uh... MSIL? Whatever. You can code for .NET in so many languages. I think there Pascal, Cobol, Perl, and many many more.

The point is, it's about the Framework, not VB, per se. It's just that VB is much easier for some folks to pick up, and if you've use VBA, VBS, or just play VB before, it's a bit syntactical leap, but worth it.

Thanks for the additional input guys I'll think it over, my manager is off for the week so I've got time.