Making changes to menu for multi OS booting

OK. So I have tried just about everything to get Ubuntu to work on the new computer I just built, unfortunately what I think may be due to the Nvidia 7900 GTX I installed in the computer, Ubuntu fails to start the X server. I have the latest version and changing settings and resolutions in all manners has failed to show any results. (If anyone might be able to help me with this that would be great.)

In the meantime however I wish to remove Ubuntu. However when one installs Ubuntu it creates its own menu for selecting which OS to boot up at power on of the computer, and this doesn't seem to disappear when I remove Ubuntu. In fact I can't boot anything since apparently removing Ubuntu not only doesn't remove the menu but causes it to not operate correctly. So what I want to know is what I have to do in terms of changing or removing files such that I can return to just booting up my different versions of Windows on power up rather than this menu that Ubuntu installs to select what OS to boot.

Dream wrote:

(If anyone might be able to help me with this that would be great.)

Have you installed the nVidia binary driver?

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/BinaryDriver...

This worked when I couldn't get grub off my computer, when I did pretty much the exact same thing.

1) If you have a DOS bootdisk, great. If you don't, make one.
2) Boot the machine, and get to a command prompt.
3) Type in "fdisk /mbr" and hit enter.

Obviously, make sure your bootdisk contains FDisk, as I've found a few downloads that didn't.

*Legion* wrote:
Dream wrote:

(If anyone might be able to help me with this that would be great.)

Have you installed the nVidia binary driver?

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/BinaryDriver...

No I hadn't. I will try that tonight, thanks.

Thank you PurEvil for the info you provided as well.

Hope the binary driver worked. If you're using an ATI or nVidia card in Linux, you need the binary drivers. The free drivers are rough attempts at getting the hardware to work, mainly for the die-hards that won't use closed, binary drivers.