Convert website from IE-only to browser agnostic?

I inherited an IE-only app/website. It's ASP.NET, and doesn't like firefox. More importantly, I'd like to be able to support Mac-users(our market is educational, and that's probably 15% of our portential market, nothing to sneeze at).

So, are there any tools that will look at my code (and ignore all the in-line ASP/ASP.NET code) and tell me what's not going to work outside of IE 5.5 and up?

Unfortunately, a spider probably won't work, or anything that works on a spider basis, as the site requires login and a lot of navigation is javascript events from "buttons" rather than simple links.

Thoughts or ideas?

You can try setting up a test environment, removing the login needs and running the w3c checker or you can do it the longer way and test it in all the browsers you can think of.

And *this* is why I hate ASP.NET. Everyone always talks about how easy it is and how powerful it is, but the controls that they provide and such just aren't friendly to anything other than IE. I've never heard of a tool that does what you describe, but if one exists I'd be very interested in knowing about it. So, in short, my post was the typical: rant, "I have nothing to contribute but am interested too."

baggachipz wrote:

And *this* is why I hate ASP.NET. Everyone always talks about how easy it is and how powerful it is, but the controls that they provide and such just aren't friendly to anything other than IE. I've never heard of a tool that does what you describe, but if one exists I'd be very interested in knowing about it. So, in short, my post was the typical: rant, "I have nothing to contribute but am interested too."

I use ASP.NET every day. Works just fine in IE, Opera, Safari, Firefox, insert wtfever browser here-->.

It depends on who is doing the work so don't knock a platform language because there are morons out there without any skill/brains. ASP.NET rocks hard.

*edit*

Oh, and your comment about the controls? Completely baseless in my experience.

Ditto Dr.G.
The .NET controls emit plain old HTML. The problem lies with the doofus implementing it taking the easy way with his client-side scripting.

Pure .NET(just like any server-side page generation technolog) works fine with all browsers, but what the developer does with the HTML doesn't necessarily work. If you're gonna use DHTML, use standard DOMs and scripts and controls, dammit.

My problems don't stem from .NET, they stem from a previous developer assuming he could dictate the client, and now I'm trying to move us away from that.

Edit: So, if I want to do my initial development/iterative testing with one browser for speed, which browser is the most standards compliant and the least "loose" with enforcing those standards. IE is just wretched about allowing people to write crappy HTML/JS, and while nice for the user, sucks for the developer.

So, if you were going to start with a single browser as your non-IE target, what is it, assuming you don't have a Mac/OSX/*nix?

duckilama wrote:

Edit: So, if I want to do my initial development/iterative testing with one browser for speed, which browser is the most standards compliant and the least "loose" with enforcing those standards. IE is just wretched about allowing people to write crappy HTML/JS, and while nice for the user, sucks for the developer.

So, if you were going to start with a single browser as your non-IE target, what is it, assuming you don't have a Mac/OSX/*nix?

I'd use Firefox first, then perhaps Opera. Using both should enable you to be nearly 100% compliant/workable with Safari. After that, just find someone with a Mac

Dr.Ghastly wrote:

I use ASP.NET every day. Works just fine in IE, Opera, Safari, Firefox, insert wtfever browser here-->.

It depends on who is doing the work so don't knock a platform language because there are morons out there without any skill/brains. ASP.NET rocks hard.

*edit*

Oh, and your comment about the controls? Completely baseless in my experience.

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My experience with it is light, I've had to go in and "fix" about half a dozen ASP.NET sites in my life. All of them were a total abortion of code. If there is a way to use it that is totally cross-browser and standards compliant (I'm talking about the 'buttons' it spits out, the 'datagrids' it makes, etc) I've yet to see it. The crap I've seen it spit out made FrontPage look like a Michelangelo sculpture. The arguement, then, is of course that it was the previous developer who did things wrong to make it so bad. I've yet to see a more straightforward scripting language ever allow such travesties to be created. It would seem to me, then, that ASP.NET is a dangerous weapon indeed. /tangent

I always just use firefox to develop in, it seems to work the best as a starting point for cross-browser developmennt in my experience. Which you may not respect anymore.

The crap I've seen it spit out made FrontPage look like a Michelangelo sculpture.

Not to derail my own thread, but FrontPage is arguably the single best WYSIWG html editor out there for quick and easy website and navigation design... if you know how to make it spit out pure HTML. If you don't believe me, ask DuckiDeva. She's been using FP since before MS bought it to build and deploy all her sites, and most of them work in any browser on any OS - yes, including Lynx. Honestly.

That aside, IE has made web developers lazy, and its market dominance a few years back made it easy to say "Bah, everyone has IE, Netscape is dead, Opera is obscure, just develop for IE, and if the custom HTML makes life easier, then we finish faster."

Bad precedent, but I saw it happen so many times.
ASP.NET spits out good code, but it's up to the developer to NOT implement IE-only features.

You're pretty much stuck with dumping it into Firefox and manually fixing it. Fortunately, FF's glut of webdev tools shouldn't make this TOO painful to fix.

Also, most surprisingly, if you're needing to dive into fixing the JS, check out Microsoft's knowledgebase for JS. I'm dead serious. They document everything IE does, AND
they document where it diverges from the DOM standards!

Strange to find a resource like that on the MS site, I know.