Recommend me THE progamming software.

If you want to get a job in the Seattle area, get VS .NET and don't look back. Otherwise, it won't hurt you to learn a few other environments. I've found that code will be much tighter if you design it to be cross-platform.

Minase wrote:

If you want to get a job in the Seattle area, get VS .NET and don't look back. Otherwise, it won't hurt you to learn a few other environments. I've found that code will be much tighter if you design it to be cross-platform.

I'm all for VS.NET, I just started playing with the 2005 and theres a lot I like in there so far, though some things are weird, but I have to echo some comments here in that you really want a good grounding in the basics before deciding on an IDE.

It's not 100% essential, but getting a good grounding in OOP theory and design is a very good thing(tm). Of course this doesn't mean you can't do it inside the VS.NET IDE, but don't negelect the children under the stairs (PHP, Python) if at all possible

Do any of you have experience migrating from Visual Basic 6 to .net? I have a big for-fun RPG that I've coded in Visual Basic 6 (which I may soon inflict upon the hapless beta-tester-friendly Gamers With Jobs members) and I'm considering the move to .net. Will it eat my code and spit out an error-producing lump (as the move from 4 to 6 did for me), or is it pretty friendly? How does it handle "outdated" programming conventions like GOTO in code conversion?

This is pure speculation on my part, but my guess is: A spewing of errors, the likes of which ye hath never seen. Though, I've only used C# in .net so I could be completely wrong.

Check this out though: http://www.thescarms.com/VBasic/VB6v...

Puce Moose wrote:

Do any of you have experience migrating from Visual Basic 6 to .net? I have a big for-fun RPG that I've coded in Visual Basic 6 (which I may soon inflict upon the hapless beta-tester-friendly Gamers With Jobs members) and I'm considering the move to .net. Will it eat my code and spit out an error-producing lump (as the move from 4 to 6 did for me), or is it pretty friendly? How does it handle "outdated" programming conventions like GOTO in code conversion?

You will need to re-write it from scratch. It handles VB6->.Net conversions horribly in the times I tried it.

A spewing of errors, the likes of which ye hath never seen.

Even my girlfriend, who knows little about programming, giggled like crazy at this line. What is it about baggachipz that makes everyone laugh? The world may never know. But we are glad that he (or she) is here.

Based on this input, I will probably stick with VB6 to the fin of my magnum opus. It uses Easy Sound and... not much else, so even your grandmother's computer with a 233mhz pentium with 1 meg VRAM (and vb6 runtimes) should run this game.

Q: Why are you programming a game in Visual Basic?
A: Because noone will expect it will actually be finished..

Puce Moose wrote:

What is it about baggachipz that makes everyone laugh? The world may never know. But we are glad that he (or she) is here.

Wow, I had no idea that I ever made *anyone* laugh. My existence is justified! Thanks Puce!

When shifting from DOS-based programming to Windows programming, Visual Basic was the language that helped me the most. It was easy enough to not get in the way of fundamental understanding of the event-based Windows functionality (which is different from linear DOS functionality).

From VB I went on to Delphi and Visual C. However Pascal-based languages (Delphi, Free Pascal) remain being my secret and true love.

Personally, I've learned a little bit of several languages in the past few years. I started on VB6 and then Java, and looking back, I'd have to say that VS and NetBeans made it way too easy to start. I'm currently taking a course in C++ that uses Linux machines and emacs. A lot of people (myself included), even some of us who had previous experience found it difficult to program without an IDE at first. It would have been a lot better to start with an editor before using an IDE. I suppose that VB6 was a nice easy introduction to programming without being too overwhelming, but it did make me wish for the safety net when I started C++. Python is also a fairly simple language to start on. My physics lab used vPython for some simulation work earlier this year, and even people with no previous programming experience were able to pick up the basics in a few weeks.

doihaveto wrote:

(As for general intro to programming, I'd personally recommend starting with a functional language like Scheme, but that's just my bias... )

I have some friends who are learning that for the introductory CompSci class. From what I heard, it's not a fun language to learn.

Red Peasant wrote:

I have some friends who are learning that for the introductory CompSci class. From what I heard, it's not a fun language to learn.

I'd put it like this: the language is so approachable, that it lets instructors teach the syntax very quickly, and go directly to teaching advanced CS topics.

And that's not a bug, that's a feature!

lethial wrote:

Out of curiousity, do you guys all use Vim or Emac? I never could sit down and learn all the commands, i rather just spend the time to program. Plus, being a gamer, I am finding it difficult to adjust to the "hjkl" of vim...

I like vim.

Every version of vim I've used knows how to use the arrow keys out of the box. Also, if whatever installation you use doesn't do it already, I'd really recommend doing ":set bs=2", which will make the backspace key behave like you'd expect it to in Notepad and the like.

Personally, for the relatively small projects I do, all I need in an editor is syntax highlighting (and vim supports darned near everything in this regard), and auto-indenting is also nice. The ability to just click to compile is nice, but I've recently taken to Python, where this isn't an issue.

(On that note, Python is an excellent language. Object-oriented, with some functional features. Both dynamically and strongly typed. Brain-mashingly introspective; functions and classes are both first-class objects. Metaclasses are fun. Compiles to bytecode, if that appeals to you. Prefers keywords over syntax. The philosophical antithesis of Perl, in many ways. It makes an excellent first language, and can be used for serious stuff, too. Civ IV was about half-written in Python.)

For gcc on Windows, I've always been happy with MinGW, which Dev-C++ uses by default. (I am not even sure Dev-C++ will work with anything else.) Cygwin has always struck me as a dirty hack. (Also, the one time I installed it was back on Windows 98, where it was totally unstable. I have since aquired an actual Linux box, lessening my need for it.)

I've used and liked Visual C++ 2005 Express Edition, but it had some real issues with the older VC++ code I was trying to compile with it. It throws up compiler warnings (or were they errors, even?) on many old and insecure C library functions, for instance. (Admittedly, you shouldn't be using sprintf, but still...) For my own projects, I've stuck with gcc/MinGW.

I think all students of programming should have to write a makefile (by hand) for a multi-source-file C++ project at least once. It should make them happy that they never have to do it again, if nothing else.

link

Microsoft gives away Introducing Visual Basic 2005 eBook
Oh yea! Microsoft handing out free stuff, count me in! Although this will only be interesting for people who code in Visual Basic, it's still worth a mention.

Geta focused, first look at the features and capabilities in MicrosoftVisual Basic 2005, Visual Studio 2005, and the .NET Framework 2.0. Ifyou currently work with Visual Basic 6, these authors fully understandthe adoption and code migration issues you'll encounter. They'll stepyou through a quick primer on .NET Framework programming, offeringguidance for a productive transition. If you already work with .NET,you'll jump directly into what's new, learning how to extend yourexisting skills. From the innovations in rapid application development,debugging, and deployment, to new data access, desktop, and Webprogramming capabilities, you get the insights and code walkthroughs.

Looks good.

I've recently discovered Free Pascal, as well as the Lazarus project, which is like a stripped-down, free version of Delphi which compiles GUI applications for Windows AND Linux. I think I'll be sticking with that for my future programming needs.