Post a picture, entertain me!

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/KlkbF5k.jpg)

My experience of the "British section" is that it's half filled with brands I've never heard of, that taste awful.

Which is clearly why you lot think British food sucks.

Spoiler:

Should probably cross-post this to the Hot Takes thread

So wait, British people don't love Spotted Dick?

Jonman wrote:

My experience of the "British section" is that it's half filled with brands I've never heard of, that taste awful.

Which is clearly why you lot think British food sucks.

Spoiler:

Should probably cross-post this to the Hot Takes thread

The British section in our supermarkets mainly have value as a source of Flake, and Lyle's Golden Syrup. If it's a *really* good market, it'll have Irn Bru, as well.

Jonman wrote:

My experience of the "British section" is that it's half filled with brands I've never heard of, that taste awful.

Which is clearly why you lot think British food sucks.

Spoiler:

Should probably cross-post this to the Hot Takes thread

Except for Flake. That stuff is made of magic. Oh, and Ribena.

Agent 86 wrote:

So wait, British people don't love Spotted Dick?

We do, but that off-brand bullsh*t is more Pimply c*ck than Spotted Dick.

Alz wrote:

Oh, and Ribena.

'Bina is good and, all, but it's suuuuper sugary. I get a massive box of no-added-sugar Robinsons shipped over every 18 months or so. Britishcornershop.co.uk FTW!

My daughter calls it "Daddy-juice".

Went to a shopping center in India just outside Delhi some years back. It had an ethnic clothes section. That told salwars and saris.

Jonman wrote:

My daughter calls it "Daddy-juice".

My wife hates it when I call it that... ;P

Wink_and_the_Gun wrote:
Jonman wrote:

My daughter calls it "Daddy-juice".

My wife hates it when I call it that... ;P

In my house, Daddy-juice means scotch.

There's an American section in Spanish supermarkets too, but my sister-in-law and I couldn't find peanut butter for the life of us.

farley3k wrote:

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/KlkbF5k.jpg)

All the other aisles are salmiakki and salmiakki based products.

So... the bottom row is mostly BBQ and hot sauces? (I'm trying to ignore the Cheetos) Are those really that unusual outside the US?

tanstaafl wrote:

So... the bottom row is mostly BBQ and hot sauces? (I'm trying to ignore the Cheetos) Are those really that unusual outside the US?

Yes and no. You can buy BBQ sauce right next to ketchup in a British grocery store, but Brits, like Americans, do love to char meat outdoors.

Honestly, most other first world cultures have waaaaaaaaay less sweetness in their cuisine. America is an outlier, and accordingly, the sweet, sugary condiments have less penetration in those cultures.

Is Sriracha American?

That's what the green lids on the bottom row look like.

Bruce wrote:

Is Sriracha American?

That's what the green lids on the bottom row look like.

Technically yeah, developed and produced in California as I recall.

farley3k wrote:

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/KlkbF5k.jpg)

Saw this in Mexico too. They had Pace Picante sauce. I laughed so hard.

What I really wanted was ketchup chips but I’ve never seen those outside of Canada.

bnpederson wrote:
Bruce wrote:

Is Sriracha American?

That's what the green lids on the bottom row look like.

Technically yeah, developed and produced in California as I recall.

Well there you go. Thanks.

Bruce wrote:
bnpederson wrote:
Bruce wrote:

Is Sriracha American?

That's what the green lids on the bottom row look like.

Technically yeah, developed and produced in California as I recall.

Well there you go. Thanks.

David Tran, the owner of Huy Fong Foods in California (the company that makes the sriracha sauce you see most often) based his recipe off a dipping sauce from Thailand. So, while the popularity is based off the sauce as it was bottled originally in 1980 by Huy Fong Foods, the origins are Asian for sure. It's a matter of perspective really.

dhelor wrote:
Bruce wrote:
bnpederson wrote:
Bruce wrote:

Is Sriracha American?

That's what the green lids on the bottom row look like.

Technically yeah, developed and produced in California as I recall.

Well there you go. Thanks.

David Tran, the owner of Huy Fong Foods in California (the company that makes the sriracha sauce you see most often) based his recipe off a dipping sauce from Thailand. So, while the popularity is based off the sauce as it was bottled originally in 1980 by Huy Fong Foods, the origins are Asian for sure. It's a matter of perspective really.

Yeah, but if we removed everything based off another culture the "American" section would be mostly empty. There might be some corn there.

My favorite part about that thread is finding a tweet from Rene Auberjonois, the guy that played Odo in DS9

pandasuit wrote:
farley3k wrote:

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/KlkbF5k.jpg)

Saw this in Mexico too. They had Pace Picante sauce. I laughed so hard.

What I really wanted was ketchup chips but I’ve never seen those outside of Canada.

Don't know where exactly you live, but if you have a Big Lots store in your area, it's pretty easy to find Ketchup Chips in those stores.

dhelor wrote:
Bruce wrote:
bnpederson wrote:
Bruce wrote:

Is Sriracha American?

That's what the green lids on the bottom row look like.

Technically yeah, developed and produced in California as I recall.

Well there you go. Thanks.

David Tran, the owner of Huy Fong Foods in California (the company that makes the sriracha sauce you see most often) based his recipe off a dipping sauce from Thailand. So, while the popularity is based off the sauce as it was bottled originally in 1980 by Huy Fong Foods, the origins are Asian for sure. It's a matter of perspective really.

I wonder if thats "based on" as in very similar to, or "based on" in the same way Wang's Kitchen down the street from me is based on traditional Chinese dishes.

thrawn82 wrote:
dhelor wrote:
Bruce wrote:
bnpederson wrote:
Bruce wrote:

Is Sriracha American?

That's what the green lids on the bottom row look like.

Technically yeah, developed and produced in California as I recall.

Well there you go. Thanks.

David Tran, the owner of Huy Fong Foods in California (the company that makes the sriracha sauce you see most often) based his recipe off a dipping sauce from Thailand. So, while the popularity is based off the sauce as it was bottled originally in 1980 by Huy Fong Foods, the origins are Asian for sure. It's a matter of perspective really.

I wonder if thats "based on" as in very similar to, or "based on" in the same way Wang's Kitchen down the street from me is based on traditional Chinese dishes.

"surprisingly heartwarming"

I lol'ed.

Ya know, I think i'm going to stop buying off brand sriracha and get the real thing from now on. That IS a heartwarming story.

thrawn82 wrote:

Ya know, I think i'm going to stop buying off brand sriracha and get the real thing from now on. That IS a heartwarming story.

I tried 2 different off-brand Sriracha sauces... I hated both of them, so much that I threw them out (nearly full bottles).

I accept no substitutes. Huy Fong, for LIFE!

Now this is a door!

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/ct0rvnr.jpg)

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/Qpfst19.jpg)

[quote="farley3k"]Now this is a door!

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/ct0rvnr.jpg)

That's where Count Olaf lives right?