Comics, etc.

Yeah, I think I bought the first trade of Lumberjanes ages ago when it first came out, but I was looking at them at the book store just the other day and thinking about her (though the book store only had some random volumes in stock, not the first). But now that I think of it, I probably have the first volume in a pile somewhere around here... It probably won't satisfy her current moment of needing straight up name brand super heroes, but I bet it'll be worth a try when she's ready for the next thing.

For non-Batgirl Big 2 books, here's what works for us:

Diana, Princess of the Amazons & Superman of Smallville should be slam dunks. And if you like Diana, check out the Princess in Black series by the same authors. They're just amazing.

Marvel Action Spider-Man did well here too, although there was a lot of pre-established love for all three Spider-People because of the PS4 game and Spider-Verse.

Zatanna and the House of Secrets & Lois Lane and the Friendship Challenge both went over really well in my house, although the main conflicts are dealing more with pre-teen and early teen emotional issues. They might not scratch the "name brand superhero" itch, too.

There are a few Superhero Adventures Spider-Man chapter books which I only got because they had Squirrel Girl and Ms Marvel in them. They're fine, but not amazing. Better than that Flower Power book i mentioned, but nowhere near as good as the ones above.

Then there's the old and new lines of DC Super Hero Girls. Also fine, I think they'll end up getting revisited when my daughter has more of a context for school and friend groups.

I just finished reading two completely different books I enjoyed immensely:

Colonel Weird: Cosmagog. Written by Jeff Lemire and illustrated by Tyler Crook, this TPB collects the four-issue miniseries that came out last year, I think. It's part of the Black Hammer universe, but this is the first book from said universe I have ever read, and I didn't feel lost. (Well, the story is about some kind of astronaut lost in time and space, so I was a little lost.) Whatever little I've read by Lemire in the past I've always enjoyed, and this book was no exception, but the true showstopper here is Crook's artwork --my goodness is it gorgeous! I liked his work in Harrow County, but I swear he has leveled up. Forget about the story --this book is worth it for the artwork alone. Beautiful, beautiful, beautiful.

Strange Academy, vol. 1, by Skottie Young and Humberto Ramos. I love Skottie Young's artwork as much as the stories he writes but doesn't draw (I Hate Fairyland, Bully Wars, and Middle West are all fantastic), and here's yet another example. With Humberto Ramos (whose work I've loved for decades) illustrating the story, what could go wrong? Nothing! In case you don't know, this book is basically Harry Potter at Hogwarts with Doctor Strange as Headmaster. If that sounds like something you would enjoy, check out this TPB collecting the first six issues of the series. A super fun read!

Finally, I haven't read this because it was just teased about four hours ago, but check this out!

IMAGE(https://i.imgur.com/W24RkhF.png)

Be excited!

The Sandman and Locke & Key are doing a cross over comic. You can preview it here Dreaming of Keys

Here is a nice video on everything Grendel.

A friend told me to try out John Allison's Giant Days.

I am on TPB #5, and just put in orders for 6, 7 and 8.

Has no one mentioned that Brubaker and Philips have begun a new series, this time composed only of graphic novels? Reckless came out in December. It's currently like $13.50 on Comixology, with a list price of over $20. I'm downloading it now.

Also on sale there until later this month is all of Baltimore, a period horror series written by Mike Mignola. I've read maybe a third of the series before and very much enjoyed it. No surprise there; I adore Hellboy and many related titles.

Importantly, the omnibuses are only $7.50 each, meaning you can get the whole series for $15. If you bought the eight trades for some reason, you'd be paying over $40, even on sale. Bit crazy since it's all digital anyway. I'm debating whether to read this soon or save it for my October horror reading, but either way, this price is fantastic.

I've noticed similar bargains with the BPRD omnibuses once before, FWIW.

Mario_Alba wrote:

Colonel Weird: Cosmagog. Written by Jeff Lemire and illustrated by Tyler Crook
Be excited!

I’m going to buy this right now!!

RawkGWJ wrote:
Mario_Alba wrote:

Colonel Weird: Cosmagog. Written by Jeff Lemire and illustrated by Tyler Crook
Be excited!

I’m going to buy this right now!!

Awesome! Let me know how you like it!

Interesting perspective from Ed Brubaker on Falcon and Winter Soldier being based on his work:

And of course, today the FALCON AND WINTER SOLDIER show debuts on Disney+, which I sadly have very mixed feelings about. I'm really happy for Sebastian Stan, who I think is both a great guy and the perfect Bucky/Winter Soldier, and I'm glad to see him getting more screen time finally. Also, Anthony Mackie is amazing as the Falcon, and everyone at Marvel Studios that I've ever met (all the way up to Kevin Feige) have been nothing but kind to me... but at the same time, for the most part all Steve Epting and I have gotten for creating the Winter Soldier and his storyline is a "thanks" here or there, and over the years that's become harder and harder to live with. I've even seen higher-ups on the publishing side try to take credit for my work a few times, which was pretty galling (to be clear, I'm NOT talking about Tom Breevort, who was a great editor and really helpful).

So yeah, mixed feeling, and maybe it'll always be like that (but I sure hope not). Work-for-hire work is what it is, and I'm honestly thrilled to have co-created something that's become such a big part of pop culture - or even pop subculture with all the Bucky-Steve slash fiction - and that run on Cap was one of the happiest times of my career, certainly while doing superhero comics. Also, I have a great life as a writer and much of it is because of Cap and the Winter Soldier bringing so many readers to my other work. But I also can't deny feeling a bit sick to my stomach sometimes when my inbox fills up with people wanting comments on the show.

So... I'm sure I'll watch it, and you should too if you're a Marvel movie universe fan, but I'll probably be waiting a while to check it out myself. So please don't email me any spoilers, I guess, but go give Sebastian Stan lots of love wherever he is online.

I don't think he's wrong for feeling that way, but he also wasnt the creator of Falcon or Bucky.

I’m not super familiar with the history of those two characters but it may be a similar situation with Warren Ellis and Iron Man. Ellis didn’t create the character but the MCU version is heavily inspired by Ellis’ comic run.

ruhk wrote:

I’m not super familiar with the history of those two characters but it may be a similar situation with Warren Ellis and Iron Man. Ellis didn’t create the character but the MCU version is heavily inspired by Ellis’ comic run.

How so? Tony Stark was already a rich, alcoholic egomaniac when Ellis was a child. Is there a storyline they copied from Ellis?

Fedaykin98 wrote:
ruhk wrote:

I’m not super familiar with the history of those two characters but it may be a similar situation with Warren Ellis and Iron Man. Ellis didn’t create the character but the MCU version is heavily inspired by Ellis’ comic run.

How so? Tony Stark was already a rich, alcoholic egomaniac when Ellis was a child. Is there a storyline they copied from Ellis?

Fed,

I thought that you might be mistaken about the alcoholic detail, but you are absolutely correct. Warren Ellis is such an edgelord, that I sort of suspected that the alcoholism bit was his contribution. But no. Ellis was 11yo when the “Demon in a Bottle” story arc was first published.

Kudos to you, my friend.

Fedaykin98 wrote:
ruhk wrote:

I’m not super familiar with the history of those two characters but it may be a similar situation with Warren Ellis and Iron Man. Ellis didn’t create the character but the MCU version is heavily inspired by Ellis’ comic run.

How so? Tony Stark was already a rich, alcoholic egomaniac when Ellis was a child. Is there a storyline they copied from Ellis?

Iron Man 3 is a hamfisted adaptation of Ellis’ early 00’s Iron Man Extremis series, but more than that Marvel Comics essentially had Ellis do a soft-reboot of the character to update his design and backstory for the post-9/11 world. That version is the one that Favreau took as inspiration for the movies. He even hired the artist for Ellis’ Iron Man series to do production design for Iron Man 1.

I'm just an old nerd who read a ton of Marvel comics growing up.

Fedaykin98 wrote:

I'm just an old nerd who read a ton of Marvel comics growing up.

You and me both

RawkGWJ wrote:
Fedaykin98 wrote:

I'm just an old nerd who read a ton of Marvel comics growing up.

You and me both

Thirded.

Though that’s probably a given considering we’re all talking about comics on the internet during a Saturday which is also the first day of Spring.

Brubaker didn't create Bucky but he sure created the Winter Soldier. There are degrees of this stuff--Ellis didn't invent Tony Stark, of course, but certainly movie Iron Man owes a fair bit to Extremis, and many other aspects of the MCU lift elements established by other comics creators. These superhero characters do have a thousand fathers/mothers in some ways, as you can imagine any of the dozens of creators involved with any of these characters over their time feel they left some sort of lasting effects on the character is, so I can't fault Marvel for not taking care of anyone to ever have any involvement with a character. But some cases are clearer than others and I think Brubaker has an especially strong case to everything Winter Soldier related. Marvel/Disney can probably get away with not compensating any of the creators who worked on the material inspiring the shows, but it also feels like they could easily do it without hurting their bottom line in any meaningful way. I would guess Brubaker is doing fine for himself financially, so I'm not exactly broken up on his behalf, but I definitely understand where he's coming from.

Mario_Alba wrote:
RawkGWJ wrote:
Mario_Alba wrote:

Colonel Weird: Cosmagog. Written by Jeff Lemire and illustrated by Tyler Crook
Be excited!

I’m going to buy this right now!!

Awesome! Let me know how you like it!

It collects issues 1-4. I just finished 2. Lemire is a badass! This is great writing and story telling. And as you pointed out earlier, the art is incredible. I only stopped so I could savor it for a little while. I won’t be able to sleep until I finish it.

edit
Done. Now I need more. I decided to go with Sherlock Frankenstein. Naturally. Then I also ordered the first two Black Hammer collections.

I love how weird the Colonel Weird story was. Go figure. I feel like it has some themes in common with Essex County.

I'm so glad you liked it! The storytelling is indeed amazing. I love how the panels flow and how Crook shows the transitions between past and present or one place and another --it really is masterful.

As for Essex County, I've never read it, but it might be about time I started it, seeing as it's one of Lemire's most celebrated works.

I think the Black Hammer universe looks interesting, but the more books they add to it, the more afraid I am to get involved. In my younger days I'd buy every Marvel comic I could afford.

These days it's not as much about the money as it is about not wanting to be sucked into a giant money pit filled with comics of uneven quality. I prefer titles that stand on their own, and ideally, have a finite length.

I’ll update you after I’ve read a few more collections.

Lemire is the author throughout the series. That’s the real draw for me. Colonel Weird is the first one that I’ve read in the series but it’s one of the more recent releases. I never got the feeling that my lack of backstory knowledge kept me from enjoying or understanding the story. I might feel differently after reading some of the earlier works in the series.

There’s probably some things that were lost on me, but I couldn’t point to any specific elements that seemed overly vague. This particular story was sort of generally vague anyway. The story deals with some themes of old age dementia.

I love whacked-out sci-fi stories. It’s set in a bizarre futuristic sci-fi world with supers and robuts and such. I would even say that it has a strong Lovecraftian feel to it. Judging by the titles of some of the other stories in the series, that seems to be entirely on purpose.

Fedaykin98 wrote:

I think the Black Hammer universe looks interesting, but the more books they add to it, the more afraid I am to get involved. In my younger days I'd buy every Marvel comic I could afford.

These days it's not as much about the money as it is about not wanting to be sucked into a giant money pit filled with comics of uneven quality. I prefer titles that stand on their own, and ideally, have a finite length.

I'm a fan of Lemire's work and I liked a lot of Black Hammer and the surrounding multiverse. But sometimes a comic series, even with a great author, can seem like a TV series...a great concept that doesn't know when to stop (at least with a singular storyline). That said, I've acquired most of the Black Hammer universe comics, but have yet to finish them all.

I just finished the first Black Hammer TPB collection. In the afterword Lemire mentions that it’s meant to be superheros meets Essex County, so my previous observation was correct. It collects the first 6 issues. Sort of serves as an origin story, but it’s well written, unlike most origin stories. Besides the supers origins it also sets up the beginning of the story.

It has that Fantastic Four flavor of a family and friends group of supers who are dealing with interpersonal problems within the group. It also reminds me of Astro City just a bit. It plays with lots of comic book tropes. This was written for superhero fans.

It’s very good and very weird. Lemire is a gift.

Hmm, well that's a strong endorsement.

I've actually never read any Astro City, either; I know some people are very keen on it.

ComiXology is having a huge sale on Godzilla comics right now. I was looking at James Stokoe's Godzilla: Half-Century War in particular, and as it turns out, that collection (the digital version) is $1.99 on Amazon right now. Guess who just bought it.

I missed this Red Skull dust-up between Jordan Peterson and Ta-Nahesi Coates

I decided to buy some of the 2020 Eisner award winners.

Little Bird won for Best Limited Series, by Darcy Van Poelgeest and Ian Bertram. The art is really good but the story is pedestrian and the writing is atrocious. I’m guessing that they won the award based solely on the artwork? Either that or they have friends on the voting comity. I do not recommend this one.

Bitter Root by David Walker, Chuck Brown, and Sanford Greene won Best Continuing Series. I’ve read the first three issues, and it’s quite good. It takes place in 1924 and is basically a story of black heroes who fight racist white people who are possessed by demons.

RawkGWJ wrote:

Bitter Root by David Walker, Chuck Brown, and Sanford Greene won Best Continuing Series. I’ve read the first three issues, and it’s quite good. It takes place in 1924 and is basically a story of black heroes who fight racist white people who are possessed by demons.

I read the first trade last year and enjoyed it quite a bit. I'm curious to see how the movie (directed by Ryan Coogler) turns out.

Has anyone read Friendly Neighbourhood Spider-Man? I’ve heard it’s quite good.