Mobile low-power lasers deploying to Iraq

Vehicle-Mounted Active Denial System (V-MADS)

Active Denial Technology uses a transmitter to send a narrow beam of 95-GHz millimeter waves towards an identified subject. Traveling at the speed of light, the energy reaches the subject and penetrates less than 1/64 of an inch into the skin, quickly heating up the skin's surface. The 95-GHz energy penetrates 1/64 inch into the skin and produces an intense burning sensation that stops when the transmitter is switched off or when the individual moves out of the beam. Within seconds, an individual feels an intense heating sensation that stops when the transmitter is shut off or when the individual moves out of the beam. According to reports, a 2-second burst from the system can heat the skin to a temperature of 130° F. At 50 °C, the pain reflex makes people pull away automatically in less than a second. Someone would have to stay in the beam for 250 seconds before it burnt the skin,

Despite the sensation, the technology does not cause injury because of the low energy levels used. It exploits a natural defense mechanism that helps to protect the human body from damage. The heat-induced sensation caused by this technology, is nearly identical to the sensation experienced by briefly touching an ordinary light bulb that has been left on for a while. Unlike a light bulb, however, active denial technology will not cause rapid burning, because of the shallow penetration of the beam and the low levels of energy used. The transmitter needs only to be on for a few seconds to cause the sensation.

Countermeasures against the weapon could be quite straightforward "” for example covering up the body with thick clothes or carrying a metallic sheet "” or even a trash can lid "” as a shield or reflector. Also unclear is how the active-denial technology would work in rainy, foggy or sea-spray conditions where the beam's energy could be absorbed by water in the atmosphere.

Sounds like it might have some effectiveness in arid climates, but may otherwise prove to be a giant target.

Seems like this will be suited for crowd control rather than warfare. Yeah, this would have been good in the '60's.

Plan 2:
Step 1, Deploy as a less-than-lethal crowd control device. Score media points.
Step 2, Use bigger batteries for that extra 'kick.'
Step 3, Re-enact the opening scene of Mars Attacks, but with camels.

Remind me to pack my foil-underpants!

So now people will laugh at tinfoil hat wearers less often?

More once they realize that the tinfoil will only serve to boil your insides quicker after the laser's joules get upped a bit for the lethal version.

I wonder how long it would take to cook a camel using these?

Wait, these could be just torture devices in disguise! Bush Admin you outsmart us again!

I can't wait to see them field the Quad model:

IMAGE(http://img22.imageshack.us/img22/3152/cartoonsquadlaser9zt.gif)

/The bullet is enormous, there is no escaping!
//Jumping is useless.

Set Phasers to Stun!

Dr.Ghastly wrote:

So now people will laugh at tinfoil hat wearers less often?

You ever put tinfoil in a microwave? That's what the thing is, technically.

Yes, it's a huge target.

I love when people say "It's torture! It's inhumane!" The alternative is generally bullets...

LobsterMobster wrote:

I love when people say "It's torture! It's inhumane!" The alternative is generally bullets...

I believe those people are generally looking for them to use sweet, sweet cupcakes.

IMAGE(http://www.stupid.com/Merchant2/graphics/products/popgun-lrg.jpg)

LobsterMobster wrote:
I love when people say "It's torture! It's inhumane!" The alternative is generally bullets...

I believe those people are generally looking for them to use sweet, sweet cupcakes.

cupcakes make you fat and ugly

I am vehemently opposed to the use of deadly cupcake force. The high sugar content of these cupcakes not only can hop up innocent bystanders but also causes environmental problems that contaminate the land for future, toothless generations.

Maybe we could make the insurgents obese and diabetic. We are bringing them American freedom, after all.

I'd like to hear what this is projected to do to the recipient's chances of getting cancer.

I'd rather take a rubber bullet, really.

Morrolan wrote:

I'd rather take a rubber bullet, really.

Well, in the question of Cake or Death...I'll take Cake, please.

".... so my choices are Or Death?!?"

"Well we only brought three bits and we didn't expect such a rush!"

/british accent

This reminds me of the eyesafe laser rangefinder debate. The fire control system of the Abrams main battle tank uses an eyesafe laser rangefinder. You see, unlike in Battlefield, tanks are not point-and-click, they're aimed kind of like artillery. If you get struck in the eyes by this laser, it will not hurt you. However, it will mean you've got a 120mm APFSDS round aimed at your face.