Time traveler = good line of business

http://tv.yahoo.com/news/wwn/2003031...

NEW YORK -- Federal investigators have arrested an enigmatic Wall Street wiz on insider-trading charges -- and incredibly, he claims to be a time-traveler from the year 2256!

Hey, now we all will have someone to blame if we fail in stock market!!!

..except for those of us who are from year 2256, of course.

Slightly off-topic: you guys here are with incredibly different backgrounds and I assume that someone has dug deeper in economics as well - can anyone please clarify something for me:
Why Are Stockmarkets So Damn Sensitive?
I mean - whats the big deal if executive of chips company has broken his arm - its not that while he`s in hospital, factories are unable to continue production? ok, that was example from thin air, but you got the idea.

I`m always getting puzzled with this. Prime minister of trird world country gets caught in bribery. Stocks shudder. Vice president`s daughter can not find good broom. Brokers open cheap whiskey bottles. Look what happened in 9/11 - its not that the plane hit the factories or stores where the real Process happens, but stocks markets fainted. What the hell?

Saw a link to this one on fark couple of weeks ago, the story stunned me too but then I read the last line of the article: ""Weekly World News will continue to follow this story as it unfolds. Keep watching for further developments."" Too bad WWN is a prankstermag, the premise itself is too cool to skip over though.

"Most" wrote:

Hey, now we all will have someone to blame if we fail in stock market!!!

..except for those of us who are from year 2256, of course.

Slightly off-topic: you guys here are with incredibly different backgrounds and I assume that someone has dug deeper in economics as well - can anyone please clarify something for me:
Why Are Stockmarkets So Damn Sensitive?
I mean - whats the big deal if executive of chips company has broken his arm - its not that while he`s in hospital, factories are unable to continue production? ok, that was example from thin air, but you got the idea.

I`m always getting puzzled with this. Prime minister of trird world country gets caught in bribery. Stocks shudder. Vice president`s daughter can not find good broom. Brokers open cheap whiskey bottles. Look what happened in 9/11 - its not that the plane hit the factories or stores where the real Process happens, but stocks markets fainted. What the hell?

I looked a few places for a link to answer your question, and found this: http://www.howstuffworks.com/stock.htm
Hope it helps. Personally, I believe that nobody really knows how the markets work anymore.

From Slashdot comments, so take it as you will

This is an interesting story, and there are several things we
should note about it. First of all, it''s posted in the
""Entertainment News & Gossip"" section of Yahoo! TV. That should
be a fairly big give away. Second this guy allegedly got
arrested January 28th, yet no major news outlet has picked the
story up.

With those pieces of information let''s look at the story. The
story claims this guy made $350 million dollars in two weeks
with only an $800 dollar investment by making 126 high-risk
trades. It also alleges that he came out a winner every time.
The article then leads you to believe the SEC thinks it''s
insider trading and that his story about being from the future
is obviously false. Yet any person with reasonable intelligence
will realize that even with insider information, there is no way
someone could make 126 ""high-risk"" trades and come out on top
every time. To have a record that perfect someone would need
foreknowledge.

The article appears to be trying to persuade us that the man had
insider knowledge, yet when you evaluate the story at face
value you walk away thinking ""no way, insider information isn''t
*that* good. He *must* be from the future"".

The major problems with this story though lie in the basic
facts:

1. There is no Andrew Carlssin being investigated by the SEC
2. The SEC does not have police powers and cannot arrest people
3. The alleged high risk trades didn''t take place
4. There is in fact no record of *any* of the events mentioned

I could go on and on, however there is absolutely no solid
factual information to back this story up. I saw this article a
few days before April 1st, so I thought it was some type of
elaborate April fools day joke, but I wanted to put it to rest
once and for all, so I called the SEC Public Relations office.

They said the article is completely made up and has no basis in
fact. It''s not even based on an actual investigation.

Of course we knew all this because this story is posted in the
""Gossip"" section though.

Doug Tolton

Still it was a funny read...

Thanks Pyroman...next time warn us if you''re going to post SPOILERS! You''ve ruined a perfectly freaky bizarro world fantasy I was having.

LOL
I never really thought of it like that. Truth is SPOILERS for next week''s episode of Earth.

"Most" wrote:

Why Are Stockmarkets So Damn Sensitive?
I mean - whats the big deal if executive of chips company has broken his arm - its not that while he`s in hospital, factories are unable to continue production? ok, that was example from thin air, but you got the idea.

The simplest explanation is that the investors like predicitability. Anything that is somehow unexpected usually causes all sorts of turmoil. The reality is, however, most investors (not counting institutional investors like banks and mutual funds, etc) are eager sheep that will follow whatever whims the media emphasizes and whatever drivel comes out of the mouths of analysts. Uncertainty is the bane of investors who like to be told they''re doing the right thing and that everything will be okay.

When it comes down to it, the markets are not all that dissimilar from high school. When popular person X (maybe in this case a popular CEO or an analyst) wears something cool, it''ll drive the hordes of middlings with no true identity or ideas of their own off into that direction (perhaps investing in some particular stock). As soon as popular person X changes their mind, sneezes or otherwise moves in a different direction, more often than not the hordes will appear confused for a moment then follow along to the next thing -- whether its the ""right thing to do"" or not. Its not unlike cattle that stampede as soon as something shocks or surprises them.

Although the above may sound like it, I''m not bitter or hard on the market, but its important to understand that all of the hard data aside, the markets are as finicky as a teenage girl trying to pick a prom dress.