Gnome 2.2 and Kickin Rad

Anybody here use Linux on thier Desktop? At work I use RedHat 8.0 with GARGNOME running Gnome 2.2. Very sweet!

True, it's still not to the point of Windows XP, but that is only because you have to go to the command line to configure things sometimes. Other than that, Nautilus (the file browser for Gnome) kicks the sh*t out of Explorer. With the new SVG (scalable vector graphics) stuff in Gnome 2.2, you can have icons, wallpaper, fonts or menus made from SVG (like in OSX) so that you can change to a higher resolution and your desktop will look the same. Theres also the built in zip/tar handler, built in image converter/viewer and metathemes (one theme file handles themes for all GTK 2.0 applications, so things like Gaim look just like your theme).

Anyone else have any experiences running Linux as a Desktop machine?

Yeah till i accidentally reset my machine and it corrupted the password, and all of my linux acquantances(can you really be friends with somebody who likes linux? ) told me I had silly expectations if I expected anything else because linux is a real os(note they gave a tech answer, i just shortened it a bit).

Although I have been thinking about revisiting it to see how its advanced.

Yeah till i accidentally reset my machine and it corrupted the password, and all of my linux acquantances(can you really be friends with somebody who likes linux? icon_biggrin.gif )

Wow, Ive never had that happen, though I think now it wouldn''t be a problem because of journaling file systems. When your computer isn''t shutdown properly, you shouldnt be at risk of losing data on a modern Linux instal with JFS.

Youre also right, the #1 problem with using Linux is the assholes who try to give support for it. I wouldn''t really try linux at this point unless you''re willing to learn on your own (with the help of Google or if you have a few good friends who already know about Linux. Of course, this leads people to be less likely to give help because they had to learn it themself, why shouldn''t you? Fortunately Ive got a few good friends who use Linux alot, and I know quite a bit myself, so I don''t have much problem with it (as long as Google is handy, of course).

what I love about Linux is that while you are using it you always learn a lot about your system. You have to dig deep to get some things running, but that makes the users of the OS also a lot more compentent than the average windows user. I also was a big fan of enlighenment. Now that is what I call a great looking and configurable desktop
What made me deinstall it again and reinstall windows was that you could not get really productive with linux. With that I mean do software development on linux for a living. The last company I worked for did Linux ports of their products. I talked to an ex-colleague who still works there: All in all we sold 6 Licenses of the Linux port. And it took us one year and a lot of investment (buying a COM port for Linux) to get things running. To me Linux is a really good OS as a hobby. I would never base any business on it though. Fingers crossed that this might change some day, because I really dig that OS.
For the phrase Linux on the desktop - as long as the Linux devs are only trying to simulate windows and do not innovate I do not see them going anywhere.

I agree with some of the sentiments above regarding the Linux user community. There''s too much in-fighting between users of various distros, there is too much focus wasted on totally demonizing Microsoft (""M$ Windoze is teh suk!!1!!1!""), user to user support tends to be nearly hostile at times, and often constructive criticism is met with howls of outrage from the Linux zealots. And now, the Linux company you see in the tech and mainstream press the most is Lindows.com Ahhh Lindows.com... The OS that wants to be Windows, the website that wants to be Apple.com.

I tried out various distros for a while, starting with Red Hat 5 way back in the day, versions of Mandrake from 7 through 9, Lycoris Desktop/LX, an ""Interent Appliance""-type desktop called OEOne HomeBase, and most recently Red Hat 8.

Mandrake was good, but felt like all kinds of software was thrown into it just for the sake of it. Very chaotic and unprofessional feeling.

I liked Lycoris just because it was pleasant to use and was really pared down. It really seems like they went the extra mile to put together a desktop that would look and feel consistant to the user.

I liked OEOne because they were really doing something different, getting away from the whole ""Start/Foot/K"" menu type of interface and running their whole interface on top of a Mozilla (as I understand it). It really has glimpses of being ""the linux your grandmother could run"" ... once someone else set it up for her

Red Hat 8 was really the most usable system right after setup, however, and I think they are really on the right track. I''ve always liked Gnome, I liked the ""Bluecurve"" theme, and having great looking fonts right after install is a nice consideration.

With all that being said, when I was using Linux, I was always futzing with something, trying to fix or configure something or other. It started to feel like my PC was running me rather than the other way around. I know some people like to tinker, and I did too at one point, but I just grew weary of it.

So, I bought a Mac. I''m very happy with it.

I''m currently running a Win98SE/Red Hat 8.0 combo and am quite satisfied with the way it works now. Using Win98 basically to play games now. If you look at most of the modern Linux distributions I don''t think that that the system is overall more complicated than Windows. The reason why it''s often perceived as more complicated is that most people are simply used to Windows. If there''s trouble or something to set up one almost intuitively knows where to start first because one has done it 1000 times before. If you''re new to Linux one can be somewhat confused (""Where did that software just install into?""), but overall most answers can be easily found via google (if you''re tired of man pages) or in th software documentation - if you encounter a ''problem'' you''re unlikely to be the first one. Got the installation, internet setup and printer access done within 40 minutes - and I wouldn''t consider myself as ''X-expert''. Of course, if you''re not a fan of internet recherche and don''t have any Linux experts among your friends it''s likely to be more troublesome in the beginning if you want to do something that''s not provided by the standard installation and don''t know how to. And if your current system runs stable and does whatever you want it to do there''s no real reason to switch unless you personally feel the urge to toy around with something new.

And if your current system runs stable and does whatever you want it to do there''s no real reason to switch unless you personally feel the urge to toy around with something new.

Very true. The other major problem with using Linux is that so many people want to use it because it''s ""cool"", not because they want it to do something for them. I started using Linux for the advanced network routing features like IPTables, and once I got it to do that I was fine. My little box sat there and hummed and I didn''t mess with it anymore. Later, I wanted to run a HL server. Then I decided to have it be a webserver, etc. Thats the way to use Linux, IMO, get it to do what you want, then leave it alone till you get the itch to do something with it again. People that just start using it for everything, they get burned out quick. Of course, that''s true for pretty much any operating system. Yes, even Windows.

I am pretty new with Linux. I am going to be testing Squid and some Linux based e-mail client as alternatives to MS solutions.

My dad gave me a laptop he bought from a company he used to work for when they were selling off old inventory. It''s a ThinkPad 520X which is practically an antique. It''s 200MHz and had 32MB of RAM. It barely ran the Windows 95 that was installed on it. Keeping it in running condition was becoming more of a hassle than he wanted to deal with so he offered it to me. I wasn''t really sure what I''d do with this thing either, but I really liked its size. It''s subnotebook size and the floppy and cd-rom are both external attachments. So I went to Crucial.com and maxed out its memory to 96MB. I downloaded and burned the ISOs for Mandrake Linux 9.0, reformatted the drive and slapped on a pretty minimal install. I had enough space for KDE or Gnome but not both so I just went with KDE. I barely ever boot up into XWindows, though.

I keep the thing under my bed and boot it up each night as a sort of journal. I write by hand so slowly that every attempt at a journal in the past has been a wasted effort for me. With this thing, I can boot it up, type a few paragraphs in vi, and shut it down in the time it would take me to handwrite a few sentences. It''s like my very own blog. All of you are in it and it''s extra slanderous.

I''ve installed Linux on a partition of my desktop on a couple occasions. But I''ve found I don''t really do well with the dual-boot thing. I either use one or the other. And, since all of my mail archives and bookmarks and what-not is already sitting on Windows, I rarely found myself booting into Linux. If I were to make the switch, I''d have to go whole-hog.

All of you are in it and it''s extra slanderous.

Whats its IP? Just curious you know.

I either use one or the other. And, since all of my mail archives and bookmarks and what-not is already sitting on Windows, I rarely found myself booting into Linux. If I were to make the switch, I''d have to go whole-hog.

While I agree theres not a really good way to sychronize bookmarks (unless you call rsync every hour or so between the machines, and then that only works if you have the same browser installed on both machines), I fixed my mail problem. I used to have all of my mail archived on my Windows machine, then I lost it in a mozilla install-gone-awry accident. At that point, I decided to use my tiny linux router as an IMAP server. That way, no matter what stupid things I do to my desktop machine, my email is always safe. Now Ive went a step further, running SquirrelMail on a machine to use for my email. This way, no matter what computer I am on, I can always access my email. I find it works great, and really frees me up to do whatever I want to my desktop. No matter what I do, as long as I have a webbrowser I am kosher.