GWJ Conference Call Episode 239

Conference Call

The Wager, Frozen Synapse, Galaxy on Fire 2, Unpleasant Horse, The Shiva, Mystery of The Abby, Brand Loyalty, Your Emails and more!

This week Shawn, Rob Zacny, Rob Borges and Jonathan Downin take you on a wonderous journey into the world of brand loyalty.

To contact us, email [email protected]! Send us your thoughts on the show, pressing issues you want to talk about or whatever else is on your mind. You can even send a 30 second audio question or comment (MP3 format please) if you're so inclined. You can also submit a question or comment call in to our voicemail line at (612) 284-4563!

Sponsor

CastMedium
Game Thing Daily
Good Old Games

The Wager
Frozen Synapse
Unpleasant Horse
The Shivah
Mystery of The Abbey

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Show credits

Music credits: 

Intro/Outtro Music - Ian Dorsch, Willowtree Audioworks

Frozen Synapse - Theme - http://www.frozensynapse.com/ - 0:35:35

Galaxy on Fire - Theme - http://www.fishlabs.net/en/games/gal... - 0:56:06

Comments

Tanglebones wrote:
wordsmythe wrote:

I mostly only feel loyalty to defunct brands. You slap Dynamix, Origins, TSR , FASA, SSI or Avalon Hill logos on something, though, and I'll be sure to pay attention.

New: Betrayal at Gold Box Mech Commander and Allies

Please try not to turn me on while I'm at work. I don't need the trip to HR.

LarryC wrote:

The only brand I'm loyal to is Hershey's. When I buy their Milk Chocolate, it's always the same Milk Chocolate I've always loved. It doesn't change. It doesn't break down. It's doesn't betray my credit card information to identity thieves. It doesn't demand. It always understands. It's always sweet, and it always takes me back.

They are planning to close their plant in Hershey, PA and move primary production to Mexico.

Just sayin'.

I played the Wing Commander series to death, and still have all of the boxed copies. I missed Freespace 2 for whatever reason, and thanks to your suggestion have purchased it from GOG. Sounds like with mods.. this game is awesome! Should be great fun with my Saitek X52 Pro.

As for brand loyalty, the only game company I buy everything from is Bioware. They have yet to steer me wrong.

gains wrote:
LarryC wrote:

The only brand I'm loyal to is Hershey's. When I buy their Milk Chocolate, it's always the same Milk Chocolate I've always loved. It doesn't change. It doesn't break down. It's doesn't betray my credit card information to identity thieves. It doesn't demand. It always understands. It's always sweet, and it always takes me back.

They are planning to close their plant in Hershey, PA and move primary production to Mexico.

Just sayin'.

So real sugar instead of HFCS?

wordsmythe wrote:
Tanglebones wrote:
wordsmythe wrote:

I mostly only feel loyalty to defunct brands. You slap Dynamix, Origins, TSR , FASA, SSI or Avalon Hill logos on something, though, and I'll be sure to pay attention.

New: Betrayal at Gold Box Mech Commander and Allies

Please try not to turn me on while I'm at work. I don't need the trip to HR.

Clearly this should have read: NEW! Gold Box Mech Commander Betrayal of Allies. 'Cause I'd play that game.

I would play it, too. I would play it all night long.

Guys thanks for reading my e-mail and having a great conversation about it!

Just to go into a little more detail, I felt that the difficulty for Call of Duty 4 was cheap. I didn't feel like my skills were being challenged in hard mode so much as I felt frustrated at being hit with multiple grenades that I couldn't dodge and dying as soon as I broke cover. As far as Dragon Age is concerned, I've recently gone back and started playing on hard as a mage. It's definitely a great feeling to down that stupid ogre in the Ostragar tower without wiping.

MrDeVil909 wrote:
gains wrote:
LarryC wrote:

The only brand I'm loyal to is Hershey's. When I buy their Milk Chocolate, it's always the same Milk Chocolate I've always loved. It doesn't change. It doesn't break down. It's doesn't betray my credit card information to identity thieves. It doesn't demand. It always understands. It's always sweet, and it always takes me back.

They are planning to close their plant in Hershey, PA and move primary production to Mexico.

Just sayin'.

So real sugar instead of HFCS?

Maybe they'll actually use cacao as well.

Those changes will only make my Hershey's a lot sexier. I say go for it!

Hey, who knew two Rob's make a right!

That was an entertaining show.

The only developer I really have a loyalty to right now is Valve. In my eyes they can do no wrong.

Wait, did I hear the word "rabbinical"? As in rabbis? Yes, I did. Just checking.

"… is about a mystery… in an abby." I dated a woman once named Abby, and I sure solved THAT mystery! Woo! No wait, that's stupid. Let me try again…

I dated a woman once named Abby, and she had a hell of a balcony! Zing! Wait, what? Never mind. I need a shower.

MSI and AMD are two companies I have been loyal to for awhile now, due mainly to the quality and value of the products. On the flip side, Intel is a company I avoid, due to their dubious business practices and high prices.

"Puddles, droopy umbrellas and people smoking." I think I just found the title for my next book.

burntham77 wrote:

Wait, did I hear the word "rabbinical"? As in rabbis? Yes, I did. Just checking.

"… is about a mystery… in an abby." I dated a woman once named Abby, and I sure solved THAT mystery! Woo! No wait, that's stupid. Let me try again…

I dated a woman once named Abby, and she had a hell of a balcony! Zing! Wait, what? Never mind. I need a shower.

MSI and AMD are two companies I have been loyal to for awhile now, due mainly to the quality and value of the products. On the flip side, Intel is a company I avoid, due to their dubious business practices and high prices.

"Puddles, droopy umbrellas and people smoking." I think I just found the title for my next book.

I think you and I need to be friends.

SallyNasty wrote:
burntham77 wrote:

Wait, did I hear the word "rabbinical"? As in rabbis? Yes, I did. Just checking.

"… is about a mystery… in an abby." I dated a woman once named Abby, and I sure solved THAT mystery! Woo! No wait, that's stupid. Let me try again…

I dated a woman once named Abby, and she had a hell of a balcony! Zing! Wait, what? Never mind. I need a shower.

MSI and AMD are two companies I have been loyal to for awhile now, due mainly to the quality and value of the products. On the flip side, Intel is a company I avoid, due to their dubious business practices and high prices.

"Puddles, droopy umbrellas and people smoking." I think I just found the title for my next book.

I think you and I need to be friends.

Funny, that's exactly what I was thinking.

A couple of points on this week's podcast:

1) If you're going to be enablers, could you AT LEAST pique our interest in games you can actually still buy? First Space Hulk and now Mystery of the Abbey. Neither of which is in print, and both of which are selling for obscene gobs of cash on Amazon.

If you're going to tell me about awesome board games, maybe try doing it before they stop making them? Please?

2) I think a lot of the backlash to last week's show is the internet's natural propensity to be contrarian. No doubt if you'd spent the episode talking about how Sony deserves the benefit of the doubt, hoards of naysayers would have written you telling you what idiots Sony employs.

Case in point, in the comments for last week's episode I distilled all of the criticisms of all three consoles this generation into one post. I didn't say anything that I hadn't heard anyone else say in these very forums. But when I used the internet's own complaints to label this the worst console generation from a cost-benefit ratio perspective, PRESTO! The problems became not so bad and everyone was happy with their purchases.

It's not so much brand loyalty, it's the internet's fickle nature.

3) I found the discussion of how to get Angry Birds gamers into, say, ARMA was intensely gratifying to me.

To me, this is the quintessential geek versus nerd issue. Gaming Nerds see people starting to play casual games like Angry Birds and get excited because they think that means people will stop giving them funny looks when they hear about, say, their romantic overtures in Dragon Quest 2. They want gaming to become "normal," and they don't care much about how that happens.

The geek, on the other hand, is concerned about what the emergence of the Angry Birds gamer will do to gaming as a hobby. Geeks would be perfectly happy to see the Angry Birds gamer try, say, a Portal game. But not if it means that Valve dumbs Portal 3 down to attract them.

Your talk about what they're doing to Mass Effect 3 to attract people who don't like Mass Effect games is geek talk. Thank you for that.

(And yes, I'm aware that by caring about the distinction between geek and nerd I reveal myself to have nerd tendencies. It's a spectrum, and you can be both a geek and a nerd to varying degrees)

(Also, don't feel bad about being a geek. It's fun being a geek, and the cake is almost never a lie)

doubtingthomas396 wrote:

A couple of points on this week's podcast:

1) If you're going to be enablers, could you AT LEAST pique our interest in games you can actually still buy? First Space Hulk and now Mystery of the Abbey. Neither of which is in print, and both of which are selling for obscene gobs of cash on Amazon.

If you're going to tell me about awesome board games, maybe try doing it before they stop making them? Please?

A good alternative deductive game to Mystery of the Abbey is Mystery Express. They share a designer (Serge Laget).

I prefer the mechanics of Mystery Express over MotA, and feel like they make for a tighter game.

The license agreement for The Wager makes me quite happy.

HedgeWizard wrote:

A good alternative deductive game to Mystery of the Abbey is Mystery Express. They share a designer (Serge Laget).

I prefer the mechanics of Mystery Express over MotA, and feel like they make for a tighter game.

Do not listen to this man. Mystery Express is a wholly unsatisfactory alternative that will plunge your gaming get-together into a sullen silence that can only be broken with the aid of a case of Corona and Rock Band. Do not buy a ticket to ride that train.

Boy, with taste like that, maybe I'm glad I'm not at HedgeCon.

Rob Zacny wrote:
HedgeWizard wrote:

A good alternative deductive game to Mystery of the Abbey is Mystery Express. They share a designer (Serge Laget).

I prefer the mechanics of Mystery Express over MotA, and feel like they make for a tighter game.

Do not listen to this man. Mystery Express is a wholly unsatisfactory alternative that will plunge your gaming get-together into a sullen silence that can only be broken with the aid of a case of Corona and Rock Band. Do not buy a ticket to ride that train.

Boy, with taste like that, maybe I'm glad I'm not at HedgeCon.

Poppycock! Pistols at dawn, sir!

Also, my one time playing ME was fueled by really good scotch. That may have helped. In fact, I may have thought I was playing Mass Effect the boardgame at that point.

I'm really, really hoping that that comment about cutting stuff out of ME3 to appeal to a broader audience is referring to planet-scanning. 'Cause yo, that nonsense can die in a fire.

I know I'm a whole week late, sorry for the stale comment. It was a really good show!

Certis seemed to unintentionally articulate the worst thing about online discussions, and I wanted to highlight it. He said something along the lines of 'gripes are understandable, but defending a company? Too far.'

I guess I just want to say: if we make tearing stuff down 'normal' and defending stuff 'too far', you end up with Neogaf. Or a Gawker site. Games are fun, I don't really get the great glee people seem to take in seeing one company or another stumble.

It's the teenage-ification of the discourse, where the easiest pose is to trash because liking stuff puts you out on a limb. We laugh at defenders but nod solemnly at the silliest, most hyperbolic haters.

Not that GWJ is like this -- at all. It just got me thinking.

Just now catching up.

On brand loyalty, I would contest that brand loyalty is too limited a phrase and instead the discussion should encompass all versions of loyalty. Any individual through life is going to change quite a bit but most people trust musicians to produce a certain level and type of music that they will like. A lot of my loyalty to things steams from being a musician and knowing the need to be supported. For a product to work as a marketplace like the iPhone, 360, PS3, Wii, etc, those products need to be supported, not unlike an artist requires business to live off of their art. When the product you prefer has a potential customer loss, that means there is a greater chance of that market being lost.

What set off my reply last episode were opinions stated like facts.