GWJ Conference Call Episode 190

Conference Call

Live From rabbitcon!, Boardgames, Listener Questions, Coronas and more!

This week we go nuts with our live show from rabbitcon with lots of board game talk, hands-on MAME time and some questions from the audience. If you want to submit a question or comment call in to our voicemail line at (612) 284-4563.

To contact us, email [email protected]! Send us your thoughts on the show, pressing issues you want to talk about or whatever else is on your mind. You can even send a 30 second audio question or comment (MP3 format please) if you're so inclined. You can also submit a question or comment call in to our voicemail line at (612) 284-4563!

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Show credits

Music credits: 

Intro/Outtro Music - Ian Dorsch, Willowtree Audioworks

"Washaway" (Ian Dorsch) - www.willowtreeaudio.com - 0:24:02
"I Wanna Friend You Up" - Slumberland - http://www.luckyghost.com - 0:41:05

Comments

I am disappointed that this isn't linked in the OP:
http://www.gamerswithjobs.com/node/5...

If the Natal is $149 as rumors are stating, I don't see how it could possibly succeed.

Furthermore, my entire game-playing experience is predicated on a single fundamental concept--other than my hands, I am moving nothing. It requires almost no physical effort from me, no easy task even for a living gamer, other than a bit of hand-eye coordination. I do not play games to jump around like a monkey, kicking virtual balls down a corridor, or punching out a virtual Mike Tyson by actually punching the air. If my game playing ability suddenly depends on my real-world physical acuity combined with having to pretend props exist like I'm in a late-era George Lucas film, count me out.

I predict the Natal will fail spectacularly, beautifully even. The Crystal Pepsi of the next half-generation in gaming, right now. The Move, on the other hand, will do reasonably well (who doesn't like playing with sticks attached to balls that change color depending on the situation?).

I never got to play Grim Fandango. I'd love to have the chance.

Great podcast.

Chairman_Mao wrote:

I do not play games to jump around like a monkey, kicking virtual balls down a corridor, or punching out a virtual Mike Tyson by actually punching the air.

You know generally I share this opinion, but as someone who's trying to get back into shape a boxing simulator might not be such a bad idea.

I haven't finished listening yet, so maybe it's answered, but I'm curious: how long are BSG games really taking you guys?

I own this game, and I've played a total of three times. The first time we played (without knowing the rules at all) it took us about 3.5 hours, and the humans won. The next time we added one new person to the mix, and the Cylon won after 3 hours. The most recent time, with a completely different group who didn't know the rules at all, we had to call it quits at the two hour mark (at around 6 jumps).

I've been thinking that, if we started with everybody knowing the rules, we could get a game down to two hours (or less if the Cylons win). Is that unrealistic?

As a side note, this game strikes me as being difficult for a new player if he/she happens to become a Cylon the first time he/she plays, since there isn't anybody to learn from and emulate. As the owner of the game and the de-facto rules-explaining-guy, I try to provide additional guidance through the first few rounds, saying something like "a Cylon might want to do x, a human might want to do y, for z reason."

Two hours seems a bit low to aim for (especially if you add in setup time). We play with the first expansion and I think our quickest game was 3 and a half hours.

I'd like to see an update to Grim Fandango a la Monkey Island where you could toggle back and forth. Nostalgia doesn't always sustain me through outdated graphics, sound, and, especially, user interface. Of course, if my options were to have the original Grim Fandango or none at all, I'll take the original.

A biblical horror wild west rpg? Have any of you played Dogs In The Vineyard? I highly recommend it. And the designer is an all-around swell guy.

EDIT: Allow me to elaborate. In an alternate history Utah, the teens of The Church of The King of Life are sent on their mission but instead of seeking converts they go to police the faithful; rooting out sin and driving out demons. By the rites of The Book of Life if possible or by the smoke of a gun if necessary.

gains wrote:

A biblical horror wild west rpg? Have any of you played Dogs In The Vineyard? I highly recommend it. And the designer is an all-around swell guy.

I bought this game after leafing through the rulebook a little bit. It seems awesome but I haven't been able to run a session yet.

gore wrote:

I haven't finished listening yet, so maybe it's answered, but I'm curious: how long are BSG games really taking you guys?

I own this game, and I've played a total of three times. The first time we played (without knowing the rules at all) it took us about 3.5 hours, and the humans won. The next time we added one new person to the mix, and the Cylon won after 3 hours. The most recent time, with a completely different group who didn't know the rules at all, we had to call it quits at the two hour mark (at around 6 jumps).

I've been thinking that, if we started with everybody knowing the rules, we could get a game down to two hours (or less if the Cylons win). Is that unrealistic?

I don't know how you get it done in such little time. The shortest game I've ever played with a full set has been 4 hours -- in fact, the first time we played, where none of us really knew the rules, it took almost 9 hours, with a break for the podcast.

Now, granted, we argue, we accuse, and as the day goes on, we all get progressively more inebriated and aggressive. But I've played five games of BSG with players of various familiarity with the ruleset, and time and again, it has proven to be at least a full afternoon/evening affair.

Now, Shadows over Camelot is a different story -- we can usually get out of a game like that in about 2-3 hours. I think it has a lot to do with Shadows' simplified traitor rules. Whereas BSG has a complicated traitor system, in which there could be up to 3 active and effectual traitors by the end of the game, Shadows only ever has one, and once she's outed, she can't really do much damage.

Ahh... Time Pilot. I used to crush that game. Thanks for memory jolt!

Deadlands is where it's at! I played tons of the original and Hell On Earth, and I almost chose the Savage Worlds version for my game group.

I only assume that the mining strike in Cripple Creek that split Teller county off of El Paso county was the set piece alluded to. One of my favorite bits of history to be sure, and one not really known outside the area... or inside for that matter.

Deadlands: Reloaded, the Savage Worlds revision of Deadlands, is a beautiful book. And the setting and rules are awesome too.

Just a culinary note guys: if you're having ribs, pulled pork, and beef brisket, you're having barbecue. When people from both Texas and the Carolinas would call it barbecue*, it's barbecue.

Damn, now I'm all hungry and the only decent barbecue joint nearby closes before I could get there.

*They'd disagree over which part of the meal was real barbecue and which part is "that other stuff," but they'd both agree that it's a barbecue meal.

KaterinLHC wrote:

Now, Shadows over Camelot is a different story -- we can usually get out of a game like that in about 2-3 hours. I think it has a lot to do with Shadows' simplified traitor rules. Whereas BSG has a complicated traitor system, in which there could be up to 3 active and effectual traitors by the end of the game, Shadows only ever has one, and once she's outed, she can't really do much damage.

Unless Pyroman is playing, and then she is a he.

I have yet to play BSG, but I never had a game of Shadows go sub 4 hours except when we got killed on hour 1 by a really nasty set of draws and poor card management. I always imagined that if I got the right group together and we played often enough we could go sub 3, but those ideal conditions never materialized.

Baaspei wrote:

Ahh... Time Pilot. I used to crush that game. Thanks for memory jolt!

Game Room has it, btw.

garion333 wrote:
Baaspei wrote:

Ahh... Time Pilot. I used to crush that game. Thanks for memory jolt!

Game Room has it, btw.

Yeah, but do they have it with an 8 way switched joystick and big honking fat buttons?

Sorry, have to gloat. I've been playing the CRAP out of TP84 to ease my post Rabbitcon depression.

rabbit wrote:
garion333 wrote:
Baaspei wrote:

Ahh... Time Pilot. I used to crush that game. Thanks for memory jolt!

Game Room has it, btw.

Yeah, but do they have it with an 8 way switched joystick and big honking fat buttons?

No, but it's only $3.

As I said in the MAME cabinet thread, I went from not being at all interested in a MAME cabinet to wanting to build one badly while following the build.

After hearing about how much fun people had with it it's become a serious desire.

When I have the space for it it will happen.

This may be asking for a lot but could someone who was at Rabbitcon post a list of the board games that were played there? I'm thinking about having a similar gaming weekend and I could use some ideas for some games to play. Thanks!

Great podcast guys!

I loved the Friend You Up song - was that more Podunk magic? Great song in any event.

SallyNasty wrote:

I loved the Friend You Up song - was that more Podunk magic? Great song in any event.

Nah, that's Slumberland. Hit the link in the OP, there's some cool stuff there, in a sort of nerd-rock vein.

Hope Slumberland doesn't mind me categorising it as such.

It would also be pretty cool if he could make 'I Wanna Friend You Up' available on its own.

Thanks very much. If you hear a screaming in the next few days it's my wallet. Or me after my wife finds out how much I spent on these.

Dear god, skip Mystery Express.

Castle Panic sounds a lot like Cutthroat Caverns: you have a party of "coop" adventurers where only one wins. In the example of CC, you're all fleeing the dungeon after having successfully nabbed the Great McGuffin, and while you escape you must fight off monsters.

The whole party works to defeat each monster (each has unique abilities) but only one player gets the kill and therefore the points. Eventually as you get closer to the exit, you start backstabbing your partners in order to be the one who survives the encounters and the dungeon. The key is to strike a balance: total player wipe if you start sniping each other early vs. allowing another to win the game.

About the Old West RPG, is that a free one, a self published or a published one?

Sounds interesting, any change to get a read on the rules or/and the module?

Friend you up was amazing.

Rabbitcon podcasts have been some of my favourite shows to listen to. There's something about getting everyone in the same room that adds so much more energy to it. Great stuff.

kabutor wrote:

About the Old West RPG, is that a free one, a self published or a published one?

Sounds interesting, any change to get a read on the rules or/and the module?

It was actually a quick invention by the GM, based off (I think) his hazy memories of once playing/hearing about Deadlands. I don't know if Rob intends to do anything official with it, but I'd buy it if/when it got released.

Really, rabbit? Getting into a boardgame is literally like going into space? You need extensive training on how to wear and operate an advanced protective suit? You need to know how to fly a spacecraft? You need hours of rigorous exercise to keep your muscles from atrophying? You eat all your food from a vacuum-sealed packet? If you open the door, everyone will die?

Or by "literally" do you mean "the exact opposite of literally?"

/rant

We are literally using the word "literally" way too much.