GWJ Conference Call Episode 129

Conference Call

Uno Rush, DoW 2, Hasbro Family Game Night, Laser Face Jones, Let's Golf, Vampire Bloodlines, Quake Live, Underappreciated Technology, The Contest Winner, Your Emails and more!

This week Sean Sands puts on the hosting hat as the crew ruminates on old gaming technologies. Suck it, OnLive. If you want to submit a question or comment call in to our voicemail line at (612) 284-4563.

To contact us, email [email protected]! Send us your thoughts on the show, pressing issues you want to talk about or whatever else is on your mind. You can even send a 30 second audio question or comment (MP3 format please) if you're so inclined. You can also submit a question or comment call in to our voicemail line at (612) 284-4563!

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Show credits

Music credits: 

Intro/Outtro Music - Ian Dorsch, Willowtree Audioworks

"PodunkStump" (Ian Dorsch) - 0:28:56
"Los Pistoleros" (Ian Dorsch) - 1:01:32

Comments

Rob, I'll RE co-op w/ you when you get your 360 back. I need a friend too...

I do believe the developer's name was Troika (troy-ka), not Trokia.

Just my 2 cents for the technology topic. Shoulder Buttons! Where would console First Person Shooters be without the SNES shoulder buttons?

Here you go Cory, Wikipedia has all you will ever need: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Troika_...

I will agree with the shoulder buttons. that was a good one.

The one that I thought about, and I can't believe no one mentioned it when the power glove was brought up.

What about the power pad?

It was the god father to popular games today such as DDR and the like. Also, it was a very good attempt at actually getting gamers up off the couch and actively participating in their video games.

Is that copy of Total War Autographed by Cory? because if not it should be, that would make it so much more valueable.

Awww, the dice, they hate me (just like in D&D). 1 in 3 chance, doesn't get much better than that!

Squishy.Turtle wrote:

I will agree with the shoulder buttons. that was a good one.

The one that I thought about, and I can't believe no one mentioned it when the power glove was brought up.

What about the power pad?

It was the god father to popular games today such as DDR and the like. Also, it was a very good attempt at actually getting gamers up off the couch and actively participating in their video games.

I thought of that, but I hated the Power Pad. There I was, running my little legs off in 1988, playing that stupid track and field game, and my cousin would get down on the floor and use his hands on the pads. Beat me every time. f*ck him.

Thanks for bringing it up.

GoldenEye sucks?!?

I'll offer a rather odd observation: High-Quality Molded Plastic

I know - totally lame. However, the Atari 2600 was encased in the consumer-electronics equivalent of titanium. When I was a kid, I can't remember how many thousands of times that damned thing fell down off a TV or how many other times I saw kids fighting over the thing. Cords flew out the back, feelings were hurt, cartridges were slammed, you name it...

If you did that with any of the early personal computers of the time they'd have transitioned into doorstops. Heck, the monochrome Intellivision that came before it couldn't compare, either. Especially when you took into account all those overlays that would become invariably folded, trodden on, and lost.

It's not a direct technology, but it sure was important to creating a consumer item that was usable long enough to appreciate it...

Quake Live doesn't use flash.
Fallen Empire doesn't use flash.

Well, not the important part.

They both use the usual graphics APIs (OpenGL in Quake Live's case), with the downloading of files and lobby systems being handled by various browser plugins.

Oh and I'm so glad you didn't talk about OnLive.

The split screen issue - having a person horizontally (vertical split) next to you is confusing because in most games you view from left to right as opposed to up and down (when playing i mean). When you split the screen horizontally you miss out on the mental confusion of having someone moving their camera in a sort of contrary way to your own.... maybe that's just me though.

LobsterMobster, didn't you buy Cory's copy of Resident Evil 5? Do you see the discord you caused?

I will definitely create another name that tune if you guys want sometime in the future. It was a lot of fun to put together.

I had to put Deus Ex in there since it has my favorite game soundtrack. I can totally see how Actrasier would sound like Castlevania though.

Hope you guys had fun with it!

Sometimes i feel like i have lived a parallel life with Rabbit, but i'm sure many here have the same feeling. I also had an Apple II, with tape drive. In reflection, i'm astonished that my mom was able to buy me that computer, given that she was a single parent working as a legal secretary. We didn't have a lot of money, and looking back, that was a significant outlay on a device that really had no productive use. But I learned so much from that thing, even doing some machine code on it. The 300 baud modem then opened up the world, and I still remember playing games like Global Domination or Taipan on BBS's. In college, I had an Atari ST, a totally underrated computer. Got me through many semesters with word perfect, and I loved the GUI. The games were awesome too, Car Wars and Battletech stand out.

Great ep, guys.

Quake Live doesn't use flash.
Fallen Empire doesn't use flash.

Oh, I totally get that, but I think the point was that Flash built the foundation -- the proof of concept -- from which these other games are born. Instant Action doesn't use Flash either, for that matter, but I wonder if Flash hadn't come along would we see this kind of adoption of browser based gaming?

I must be the only person that actually liked the N64 controller. Granted, I was younger and my hands were smaller at the time, but the first time I barely pushed the analog stick forward and Mario barely snuck forward, I was hooked.

The Rumble Pak for the N64. Upon hearing about it it seemed ridiculous, but it actually worked and it increased immersion in games. To top it off it has become pretty much standard in all controllers since then.

As for the power glove, I can remember duct taping a controller to a winter glove I had, which while seeming totally "rad" to me at the time didn't work very well, though neither did the real thing...

Minarchist wrote:

I must be the only person that actually liked the N64 controller.

I love the N64 controller. As with all of Nintendo's controllers after the SNES, it's not the most versatile controller around, but when a game was designed with it in mind it's felt elegant and natural in a way that few other controllers manage.

I'd play some more Quake Live if I knew there some GWJ'ers playing. The only problem I have with having the game installed onto my computer is the extra anticheat in the background program. It's just more junk to have on the computer, but I guess for something like this, its necessary.

The mouse made the game Lemmings possible for me. It was glorious. For about 5 hours, then I got bored.

RE: The N64 controller and analog stick. I always felt it was a good controller. Ergonomically, not great, but the button layout and all were as good as could be expected for doing what was essentially forcing the middle prong on the trident into an old controller design and adding grips to it. Also, I can't think of a single game where I used my right hand to control the analog stick. My left hand was always gripping the middle prong and right on the right hand prong. Did you do the whole hold the right and left prongs and try to reach over to the middle thing I've heard that a some people did?

Just so you know, the first colour personal computer was the CompuColor II, produced in 1977 - also the first computer I ever played games on.

http://www.computercloset.org/CompuC...

Is it just me, or does the audio seem somewhat different?

As for the 80's video Elysium mentioned:

After hearing Fraps mentioned on the pod cast a piece of technology came to mind that isn’t really old but one I think worth mentioning is the concept of recording games with the game software itself. By this I mean that games aren’t recorded on what the viewer is seeing into a .avi or .mov format but with remembering placement of objects and actions and then replaying them with in the game engine itself. I remember that the original Everquest did this but more recently Halo 3.

This is something so amazing to me to have the ability to go back in any multiplayer game and just rewitness all the crazy and unbelievable things that happen in a game (especially multiplayer) in the point of view from anyone. I still have old Halo 3 videos on my 360 that I go back to and watch just for the hilarity of it all (and I don’t think I’ve played it in 6 months or more).

I just imagine if TF2 had something like this… *droool*

Great show guys, I loved the part where you sent me back in time to the days of BBS'ing, typing in entire games from Gaming Magazines (and saving them to tape!) and generally summarizing my entire (wasted?) youth.

Good stuff!

I nominate "Yo bitches! We gone!" to be the new official close of the show.

Rat Boy wrote:

I nominate "Yo bitches! We gone!" to be the new official close of the show.

Seconded... only if said by Elysium.

Rat Boy wrote:

Is it just me, or does the audio seem somewhat different?

Sounded okay by me. I didn't really pay attention to who was coming from what angle, but the voices sounded a-ok to me.

Rat Boy wrote:

Is it just me, or does the audio seem somewhat different?

Rabble rouser! Stop tryin' to stir up trouble!

Though I didn't have any tricks to make illicit long-distance modem calls on someone else's dime, I DID spend a large chunk of high school dialing into local Pittsburgh bulletin board systems and playing Legend of the Red Dragon, Trade Wars, etc etc. I even downloaded the shareware version of those "Door Games" and set them up on my own mini-BBS for my friends to dial my house and connect to - only one friend at a time, of course, and this was on a Tandy 1000EX with no hard drive, where I had the BBS system running on one 5.25 floppy, and had to switch to a 2nd 5.25 floppy to run the games. It was glorious.

Thanks for bringing back those memories, guys. The transition from a world without interconnected gaming (for that matter, interconnected anything) to a world with it was, just as you portrayed it, completely mind-blowing. I wonder whether I'll ever have my concepts of possibility expanded so widely and rapidly as I did back in the early to mid 90's. I hope so.

EDIT: Also, my late father taught me programming and undoubtedly started my love of computers and games on what I'm pretty sure was a TRS-80 (but may have been one of the other BASIC-running tape-deck driven computers of the time) when I was maybe 7 or 8 years old, copying guessing game programs out of the back of Boys' Life magazine. Hearing you guys reminisce about that wet my eyes a bit.