Gamers with Workmates

Beefy bowling dude

2002

It's Thursday.

I've taken 10 minutes to get lunch, but I need to get back — back to billing my time in 6-minute increments. I'm walking faster than the city throng, avoiding collisions with the slow-walkers, scarfing a nori roll and trying not to spill soy sauce on my TM Lewin shirt.

There is a JB HiFi a block from my office. Going past it, I nearly collide with Brett, another lawyer and my office next-door neighbour, exiting the store. He is clutching a JB bag, whose bulges denote a more voluminous purchase than a mere CD or DVD. Brett falls in alongside, transferring the bag into the hand furthest from me, holding it slightly behind him.

"Mr Carver," I intone with a nod. Then I point to the bag and smirk. "New batteries?"

"No, it's ..." he hesitates, then holds the bag so I can see inside. "A headset and controller."

I take a peek. "PlayStation. Sounds like fun."

"Yeah, there's this game, SOCOM, where you lead a squad of soldiers and you give them commands with the headset. It's pretty cool. Um, my nephew likes it, anyway."

"So there is a use for our dictation skills outside the office."

"Heh, something like that. I don't play it much, actually, just when my nephew comes round."

I don't mention to Brett that after working with him for nearly 3 years, this is the first I've heard of his nephew, or that I have a PlayStation too and I've been playing GTA: Vice City every night for the past 2 weeks.

2007

It's Friday.

The 7 of us are marching down the street, talking animatedly.

I've finished the first week of my new career, trading in the always-on jacket and tie of corporate for the offline-server, open collar of public service. A few of my new workmates have decided to take me to the pub as an unofficial welcome. The original group of 4 has expanded since 5pm, joined by a spouse, then a girlfriend, then a boyfriend. The plus-ones clutch their partners and eye us in the bemused way that relatively sober people do.

We're heading to my apartment. It's a 10-minute walk from the bar. We need to regroup, get food and move on to the next phase of this impromptu bonding session before momentum dissipates and everyone comes to their senses.

Karaoke is mentioned, as it often is around people of a certain inebriation level. Indecisive patter follows about where to go and whether to book.

I mention that I've got karaoke at home: this thing called SingStar, and we could try it while we wait for pizza. The convenience of my argument seems to carry the day.

When we get to the apartment, everyone else is busy fussing with drinks, pizza menus and the bathroom while I start up the PS3 and cringe, controller in hand, while the system updates. No one seems to pay attention to the TV until the SingStar splash screen. I produce two microphones.

Mikail breaks the ice with "Gold" by Spandau Ballet, and with that, we are off to the races. Mikail's starting choice prompts some equally cheesy '80s and disco selections, and thankfully my song list is robust enough to cater to all without downloading anything. In order to keep participation levels high, I introduce dueling mode, so that 2 people can sing at once. No one asks specifically about the PS3, however I pick up some comments that the dueling mode and pitch detector are an improvement on "regular karaoke".

During the evening, I notice Alison perusing my games shelf. For the first time since buying the PS3, I am grateful that the shelf is quite empty. She picks up Heavenly Sword, studies the back cover briefly, then looks around and puts it back.

After a few hours of food, song, drinks and laughs, one couple makes to leave, prompting the exodus of the rest. There are hugs and smiles all round in the doorway.

2013

It's Tuesday.

I am actually excited on my ride in to work. There's so much to catch up on with my workmates. I lent Alison some games a few weeks ago, and she texted me last night that she'd finished one. The smart money is on Mini Ninjas, but I'm hoping it was Assassin's Creed or, better yet, Arkham Asylum.

At lunchtime, Mikail asks me to come to JB HiFi with him. He's got money to burn and wants me to advise on a good value console. Ultimately I counsel him to hold off until the new ones come out at the end of the year. As we wander the gaming aisles, we pass a pair of besuited corporates browsing the new releases. I think of Brett, which triggers a ping of shame for not keeping in touch since I changed jobs. I wonder if he comes to this section of JB anymore.

After lunch, I check in with Tarquin, see how his XCOM: Enemy Within campaign is going. He's been giving his squaddies gene mods, whereas I've run with a MEC-based team. I want to see if he's reached the whale mission yet. We say what a shame it is that he's on PC and me console, else we could face off in multiplayer.

I'm sure I've got some work to do as well. Better not talk to anyone about their Civ 5 campaigns, then.

2014

It's Wednesday.

On a whim, possibly induced by some daytime GWJ forum-lurking and reading about frustrating games, I've dusted off the only Souls game I have, Demon's Souls, and submitted myself for some punishment.

I muddle through the Shrine of Storms. Each time I die, I go to another level and farm an easier demon to regain my body. About the third time I do this, before I return to the Shrine, a message appears onscreen: "BrettyC_74 has invaded your game".

After panicking for a split second, I wipe the sweat off my palms, find a spot at the foot of a wide staircase, and wait with my crescent falchion and shield. Soon enough, a heavily-armoured, red-tinged male warrior rounds a corner in the distance, his huge pikestaff bobbing as he runs around in manic circles in the way that only human players or truly bad AI do. From the middle distance he starts walking cautiously, purposefully, in my direction. When he gets within spitting distance, he bows. I can't remember how to gesture and am too tense anyway. I am watching his pikestaff, which has twice the reach of my falchion.

After a bit of circling around each other, with me blocking a few staff thrusts, I bank on my mobility, roll in, swipe him a few times and roll out again. This hurts him, but he gets a thrust in as I stand up. With one blow I lose a third of my health.

I realise my character looks like a warrior with this armour, crescent falchion and shield, and in warrior terms I am outmatched. Luckily, all this falchion and shield business is my alt gear. I pull a swifty: somersaulting backwards to make some distance, swapping my falchion for my catalyst mid-tumble. Then I lock on and spam my fire spray spell, burning him when he blocks and rolling away whenever he decides to charge through my fire to get within poking distance. My stamina reserves are high enough to keep kiting him until I singe away all his health.

Although the room is empty, I raise both my hands to the ceiling and cheer. The controller tumbles to the floor, firing off another spell. Anxious to save my progress, I return to the Nexus and quit, ending my session on a high note even though I'd made no further progress in the game. I feel like I've kicked the winning goal in an indoor soccer final. I go to the fridge and pour a victory wine.

Only halfway through my glass of wine, when my heart rate returns to normal, does the name of my invader come back to me.

The next day, for the first time in years, I send Brett an email. We arrange to have lunch in a few days. At lunch, we talk about games the whole time.

Comments

I don't want anyone to think I don't value gaming, there are plenty of positives, and I could defend my gaming habit extensively.

There was some recent talk in the 3DS thread about how many people play their 3DS while riding the stationary bike at the gym. Just because you are a gamer doesn't mean you can't do other hobbies that keep you healthy.

hot dang, didn't realize Demons Souls servers were back up indefinitely
it's my only souls game as well
I'm sure I'll get back to it as soon as I finish FFXIII-1.

Maybe gaming is more prevalent in the military, I have always found that there are guys/gals that are gamers - mostly console because that is easiest to be transportable although laptops are becoming a major part of most sailors kit. The more senior you get the less prevalent, but there are always a few of us. My best job gaming moment was when I won a Madden tourney on my ship and some of the junior enlisted guys were razzing the guy I beat "Damn, you got beat by the Commander". My bubble was promptly deflated when they followed with "Dude, you got beat by an old man". Games are a huge component of barracks, ship, and deployed life for military personnel. I remember marveling over the ingenuity of some of my security force in Iraq (7th Cav and Arkansas National Guard) as they set up gaming LAN's, consoles, and Big Screen TV's that mysteriously appeared out of Humvees and Bradley Fighting Vehicles at any opportunity, cables strung across vehicles, through tents, into generators and ready to go with military precision.

SpyNavy wrote:

Maybe gaming is more prevalent in the military, I have always found that there are guys/gals that are gamers - mostly console because that is easiest to be transportable although laptops are becoming a major part of most sailors kit. The more senior you get the less prevalent, but there are always a few of us. My best job gaming moment was when I won a Madden tourney on my ship and some of the junior enlisted guys were razzing the guy I beat "Damn, you got beat by the Commander". My bubble was promptly deflated when they followed with "Dude, you got beat by an old man". Games are a huge component of barracks, ship, and deployed life for military personnel. I remember marveling over the ingenuity of some of my security force in Iraq (7th Cav and Arkansas National Guard) as they set up gaming LAN's, consoles, and Big Screen TV's that mysteriously appeared out of Humvees and Bradley Fighting Vehicles at any opportunity, cables strung across vehicles, through tents, into generators and ready to go with military precision.

They're also a bit prevalent around firehalls too where I work. A ton of guys tend to play Black Ops when there's downtime and more than a few stations have Wiis set up to play.

BlackSheep wrote:

They're also a bit prevalent around firehalls too where I work. A ton of guys tend to play Black Ops when there's downtime and more than a few stations have Wiis set up to play.

Yeah, I played WoW with a guy named Scorchman many years ago. He was a firefighter.

SpyNavy wrote:

Maybe gaming is more prevalent in the military, I have always found that there are guys/gals that are gamers - mostly console because that is easiest to be transportable although laptops are becoming a major part of most sailors kit. The more senior you get the less prevalent, but there are always a few of us. My best job gaming moment was when I won a Madden tourney on my ship and some of the junior enlisted guys were razzing the guy I beat "Damn, you got beat by the Commander". My bubble was promptly deflated when they followed with "Dude, you got beat by an old man".

Even from that opening phrase, I was thinking "Maybe youth is more prevalent in the military."

wordsmythe wrote:
SpyNavy wrote:

Maybe gaming is more prevalent in the military, I have always found that there are guys/gals that are gamers - mostly console because that is easiest to be transportable although laptops are becoming a major part of most sailors kit. The more senior you get the less prevalent, but there are always a few of us. My best job gaming moment was when I won a Madden tourney on my ship and some of the junior enlisted guys were razzing the guy I beat "Damn, you got beat by the Commander". My bubble was promptly deflated when they followed with "Dude, you got beat by an old man".

Even from that opening phrase, I was thinking "Maybe youth is more prevalent in the military."

Agreed, but that youth demographic aged/will age as I did retaining their love of games. I think "gaming" is becoming much more prevalent in my age group (40-50) .

It's nice to hear I am not the only one with a "nephew" who plays video games.

Somehow, growing up on a farm in Iowa around 1980, with parents ambivalent about video games, I got hooked. And while I had a relatively large number of friends who played games, I never found out until after we became friends.

Wasn't until I started my first real job I started meeting people because of games, the complicated German board kind.

Dakuna wrote:

Yeah, I played WoW with a guy named Scorchman many years ago. He was a firefighter.

One of my buddies was going through the fire fighter academy when he rolled his first character for DAoC, and named himself Conflagration.

McIrishJihad wrote:
Dakuna wrote:

Yeah, I played WoW with a guy named Scorchman many years ago. He was a firefighter.

One of my buddies was going through the fire fighter academy when he rolled his first character for DAoC, and named himself Conflagration.

DAoC tried like hell to ruin Law School for me

BlackSheep wrote:
McIrishJihad wrote:
Dakuna wrote:

Yeah, I played WoW with a guy named Scorchman many years ago. He was a firefighter.

One of my buddies was going through the fire fighter academy when he rolled his first character for DAoC, and named himself Conflagration.

DAoC tried like hell to ruin Law School for me ;)

I think you got that backwards.