GWJ PAX East Panel With Jeff Green & Ken Levine!

We'll be putting on our very first GWJ panel at this year's PAX East! On Friday, April 6th from noon to 1PM we'll be joined by Ken Levine and Jeff Green to talk about gaming and where it fits in as we get older. Also from the GWJ podcast we'll have Julian Murdoch, Sean Sands, Cory Banks and Shawn Andrich. Mark it in your calendars!



Gamers With Jobs Presents: Gaming For Grown-ups
Manticore Theatre, Friday 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Who said this was a young man's game? The gaming industry is getting older and so are its players. How have we changed as gamers as we become parents, responsible employees, business owners and *horror* adults? Do we spend more to play less? Do we wax nostalgic for an era that never really existed? Join us as we delve into what gaming means to us in our 30s, 40s and *gasp* 50s as we stumble ever closer to the grim reaper's dark embrace.

Comments

Tanglebones wrote:

I will be there, with bells on :)

I'll be there too, and I demand that you wear a bell, of some kind!

Really cool, wish I could attend!

Sounds awesome.

As a 40-something gamer who's been passionately hooked since childhood, I've often wondered how and when gaming would keep pace with my maturation.

In my youth I read and enjoyed Dr. Seuss and Laura Wilder's Little House books. In my teens I graduated to Stephen King-level reading. In my 20's-30's and beyond I moved up yet again to Shakespeare, Dostoevsky and the like.

So while I'm a voracious reader with options for all skill levels and tastes, I'm left wondering where the video game equivalent is for the aging gamer who's been in the thick of it since the mid to late '70s.

There are certainly exceptions to the rule out there that speak in an adult voice like the classic The Longest Journey or the more recent Heavy Rain, but these are few and far between. I still enjoy shooting people in the face ala COD, but more choice in tone would be welcome indeed.

I'd be first in line to support a theoretical title with the courage to explore the human experience, that has no violence, that is grounded in the here and now (no marines, no lasers, no zombies...oh my!). I know there is variety to be found in the indie gaming scene, but more to the point I'm curious if and when we'll see big-budget projects that speak to gamers over 30.

Anyway, hope you guys record the panel at PAX and offer it up for download afterwards. Sounds like a great opportunity to explore these issues.

Awesome, my first PAX, and my first in-person meeting of GWJers. Is there a seat-reservation system for longtime listeners? First row for one-time donations, second row for two-time donations, etc.?

Keithustus wrote:

Awesome, my first PAX, and my first in-person meeting of GWJers. Is there a seat-reservation system for longtime listeners? First row for one-time donations, second row for two-time donations, etc.?

Best Cory Banks cosplay gets dibs.

Sounds great!

Kinda wish I was going to PAX now.

Aaron D. wrote:

I know there is variety to be found in the indie gaming scene, but more to the point I'm curious if and when we'll see big-budget projects that speak to gamers over 30.

How often do big-budget works in other media do this? If I'm looking for that in film or print, I generally don't look for "blockbusters."

Is this going to be recorded? (film, podcast?)

wordsmythe wrote:
Aaron D. wrote:

I know there is variety to be found in the indie gaming scene, but more to the point I'm curious if and when we'll see big-budget projects that speak to gamers over 30.

How often do big-budget works in other media do this? If I'm looking for that in film or print, I generally don't look for "blockbusters."

I thought that was what all the Uncle-Touchy-without-his-Adderall Remix versions of everything I cared about when I was younger were for? At least according to their marketing departments. Those are in just about every medium out there, and a lot of those are termed blockbusters.

Maybe I could have phrased that a bit better.

I'm not expecting a 100 million dollar budget for a game that won't appeal to the marketable GTA/CoD/Mario crowd.

Just something that rises above the basement passion-project material we see with indie teams consisting of only a couple guys. You know, games that are inspired on a maturity level, but due to limited resources have SNES-era presentations and such.

I'd like to see something of that nature with a bit more funding behind it. Something that you can print on a disc and sell for $40-$60. It doesn’t have to have a blockbuster budget to have competitive production values aligned with common industry standards.

We're getting to an age where kids who grew up on Atari 2600 are now adult gamers with adult tastes and adult incomes. It's not a stretch to question why this potentially lucrative market is going by and large completely ignored in the industry while children, teens and college kids have all the games they could possibly want. Heck, even the elderly who never jumped on board are being catered to with free online card games, Sudoku, hidden object games, etc.

I feel like the generation of gamer that got left behind.

Can't wait.

Aaron D. wrote:

We're getting to an age where kids who grew up on Atari 2600 are now adult gamers with adult tastes and adult incomes. It's not a stretch to question why this potentially lucrative market is going by and large completely ignored in the industry while children, teens and college kids have all the games they could possibly want. Heck, even the elderly who never jumped on board are being catered to with free online card games, Sudoku, hidden object games, etc.

I feel like the generation of gamer that got left behind.

Maybe I can make you feel better with a little theory of mine: there is a birth year sometime in the late 1960s which marks a large transition in attitudes about gaming. That is, people born before this time are much more likely to perceive games as kid-only diversions.

I say this as a person born in 1961 (as Jeff Green is, I believe). For us, the most sophisticated game when we entered college was Asteroids. I don't think until the NES was there the type of game which could be considered mature, and by that time we were in our mid-20s. I just think there is a huge difference between someone who grows up in an environment where deep gameplay experiences exist and someone who comes to those as an adult. (This seems a little related to the PAX panel so it could be interesting to hear Jeff's Old Man take on this).

So for you people in your 30s and 40s, by the time you are 50 I think there may be a different type of market for that age than what exists now. By 2020 even 50 year olds will be "born into gaming" folks rather than suspended adolescent came-into-gaming-as-adults people like me (personally it wasn't until I was in my 30's that Civilzation brought me completely and irrevocably into the hobby). I think you'll see some different types of games for the oldster market at that time.

Can't wait!

fangblackbone wrote:

Is this going to be recorded? (film, podcast?)

Quoted for re-asking.

We're definitely planning to capture the audio. Video ... I don't know.

Video would be awesome. Hope that works out.

Will Cory be dancing?

Jayhawker wrote:

Will Cory be dancing?

Is he ever not?

Unclear if this will be part of the pax streaming thing they announced with Twitch TV. Regardless well get audio.

Shmello wrote:
Aaron D. wrote:

We're getting to an age where kids who grew up on Atari 2600 are now adult gamers with adult tastes and adult incomes. It's not a stretch to question why this potentially lucrative market is going by and large completely ignored in the industry while children, teens and college kids have all the games they could possibly want. Heck, even the elderly who never jumped on board are being catered to with free online card games, Sudoku, hidden object games, etc.

I feel like the generation of gamer that got left behind.

Maybe I can make you feel better with a little theory of mine: there is a birth year sometime in the late 1960s which marks a large transition in attitudes about gaming. That is, people born before this time are much more likely to perceive games as kid-only diversions.

I say this as a person born in 1961 (as Jeff Green is, I believe). For us, the most sophisticated game when we entered college was Asteroids.

Exception: war games. My father (1953) ran in some of the same historical sim games that eventually spun off Gygax and Arneson.

Certis wrote:

We're definitely planning to capture the audio. Video ... I don't know.

Arise Thread! I am wondering how the panel went and where I could listen to the audio? I will admit I do not listen to the podcast everyweek and am wondering if I missed where it was posted.

Thanks

oops double post.

Bonnonon wrote:
Certis wrote:

We're definitely planning to capture the audio. Video ... I don't know.

Arise Thread! I am wondering how the panel went and where I could listen to the audio? I will admit I do not listen to the podcast everyweek and am wondering if I missed where it was posted.

Thanks

http://www.gamerswithjobs.com/node/1...

I have been a fan for years and after hearing the panel talk of their childhood and games it was not unlike my own. I think my first games were Atari 2600 titles, but my first addiction was at a bowling alley playing Asteroids and Galaga. It was so refreshing to hear when Ken explained how people want you to move on, but he was like No, im happy who i am. I couldnt agree more.

CitizenX3639 wrote:

I have been a fan for years and after hearing the panel talk of their childhood and games it was not unlike my own. I think my first games were Atari 2600 titles, but my first addiction was at a bowling alley playing Asteroids and Galaga. It was so refreshing to hear when Ken explained how people want you to move on, but he was like No, im happy who i am. I couldnt agree more.

Speaking of Galaga, did you catch it on the show floor? The classic arcade guys set one up, and I was proud to play my best game (ever!) and nab 3rd place on the high scores list.