Mob Response

Let me get this out of the way, Paul Christoforo acted like a self-important jerk in his correspondence with a customer about delivery of an Avenger controller accessory. His self-congratulatory, imperious, dismissive explosion of barely literate correspondence to a customer asking a completely legitimate question touched as much a raw nerve with me as anyone else who has ever had to endure what passes for customer service these days. It doesn’t surprise me in the least that every single person who read the e-mail chain that began with the customer and ended with Mike Krahulik of Penny Arcade took vehement exception with virtually everything Paul said.

Though contrite now and quick to talk about how he was having a bad day —- despite the fact the e-mail conversation stretched over the better part of 2 weeks — he presented the gold-standard example of the worst kind of service. But this article is not about Paul. This article is about the response, and how deeply disquieting the sanctioned retribution of the online hit-mob has become.

The people of the internet know no limits to their charity, but neither do they seem to know limits to their bloodlust for abuse, revenge and humiliation. Even a small corner of the virtual universe can focus into unimaginable pressure — just ask GoDaddy, which has been under siege for more than a week after coming out publicly in favor of the Stop Online Piracy Act. Now, like Paul, GoDaddy isn’t exactly a sympathetic figure, but they are a cautionary tale that when the Sauron Eye of an organized internet mob turns to put your indiscretions under the microscope, the results can be devastating.

In truth, what I have taken away from both these incidents is that there is good reason to fear the tyranny and unrestrained animosity of a virtual lynching, for there is no compassion to be had in its almost random punishment.

At times like this my thoughts always turn to Micah Whipple. He was the unfortunate Blizzard employee caught in the storm of angst associated with the company’s quickly discarded idea to require the use of RealID on Battle.net. Micah made the unenviable decision to prove that using your real name on the internet is safe, and the internet seemed to turn as one to squeeze Mr. Whipple and show him the deep error of his ways. Within minutes his private information became the plaything of hundreds of thousands. How his world must have turned upside down for a day. Or a week? Or even a month?

Unlike Paul or GoDaddy, it’s hard to find much reprehensible fault with Micah. Yes, it was probably naive of him to throw himself into the middle of a brewing storm, but the result must have been terrifying not only to him but all those near to him. The level of harassment brought to bear on him is the kind of thing that will wake you up at night in a cold sweat.

In moments like this, here on the safe periphery, it all looks pretty entertaining. Heck, I’ve laughed at a few of the more clever pokes delivered to Paul Christoforo over the past day or two. But, spare a moment to imagine what it must be like to be the focal point of the laser beam. Suddenly you are completely vulnerable, exposed for an angry world with malicious intent to see. For all the good that internet communities are capable of, they have equal capacity for nothing short of unfiltered hate.

Did Paul deserve an angry rebuttal? Yes. Did he deserve to get fired? Yeah, probably. Did he deserve to get inundated with thousands of e-mails, harassing phone calls, public rebuke from hundreds of thousands and even threats of violence against himself and his family — including his two-month-old infant? Does that punishment really fit the crime?

The truth is, I’m frightened of the internet. I’m really troubled by the thought that someday I will write the wrong thing and somehow it will be the thing that locks into focus at just the right place. I have sometimes specifically considered stopping this writing endeavor and getting out while the getting is good. I’ve had as many as a few hundred people really annoyed with me before over things I have written, and that is unsettling enough on its own. I can’t begin to imagine what the pressure of hundreds of thousands or millions must feel like. And, I don’t want to know.

There is a hypocrisy at work here that villanizes people like Paul but takes no issue with the almost criminal response. Yeah, the guy was a complete tool to a customer, but you can’t tell me that’s worse than threatening the guy’s 2-month-old baby. How is that OK? How is it that we didn’t all stop at exactly that minute and turn our holier-than-thou scorn on the people that decided the best response to a guy who provided crappy service is a death threat? Sanctimonious rage, unrestrained abuse and impotent threats of violence are far more troubling to me than that someone acted inappropriately in a communication with a customer.

This is a mob, as sure and as dangerous as if it had formed in the street to throw garbage cans through windows and topple police cars, and now that it's done with Paul it's looking for the next target. And the mob mentality in its virtual form is as terrifying a thing to witness as it would be in the real world. It is remorseless, relentless and without compassion, and to me it is the real story of the past few days.

Comments

wordsmythe wrote:
doubtingthomas396 wrote:
wordsmythe wrote:
doubtingthomas396 wrote:

As my father, student of history, frequently said: In the early 1900s little French children were taught to be nice and kind and nonviolent. Little German boys were taught to be hard and aggressive. Then came 1930, and those little German boys rolled over those little French boys in 30 days.

I don't think we really need to be taking our cues for how to function in society from Germany in the 1930s.

Was that a deliberate misread? Because right after the line you quoted I said:

Bad people will always be grasping for strength. The proper response from good people is to be stronger.

The point is not to be like Germany in the 1930s. My point is to not be like the French, insofar as that means thinking that everyone will be reasonable and you can talk everything out politely.

Pacisism only works if the other side is unwilling to pound your face in if you don't fight back.

In the early 1900s was Germany definitively "evil," or just attempting to be stronger?

Taking Germany as an example, if we take as fact that Germany (functioning as some mythic collective) raised all its boys to be "hard and aggressive," then it's little wonder that such a mindset leads to a German Nation (again, a problematic view) that would respond to defeat and economic trouble with more aggression. Train your children for strength in combat, and they will view their struggles in combative terms.

We're already far off the mark, but are the straw-man stereotypes really necessary?

Ultimately, this guy was a dick. A bunch of other people were dicks in return, at the tacit request of Mike K., who was also being a dick. We can talk about how he got what was coming to him, how we're taking vengeance upon the kids who beat us up when we we kids, how beating people up is some kind of Greater Good, but all I can see here is that the world is, as always, full of dicks.

momgamer wrote:

Then you're not reading. Malor starts it off on the other thread, and four posts above mine MrDeVil909 is claiming that Mike's post "released the dickwolves". In this thread alone, disobedientlib, Nosferatu, Crawling Chaos, Prederick, TheHipGamer all have couched the discussion in those terms. ClockworkHouse is all over page two and three of the other one.

In this thread my only comment regarding PA was that I had no issue with what Mike did, given that the phone number he released wasn't intentionally a home phone number (sometimes with a small business the divide between home and business gets fuzzy).
Personally I accept the fact that sometimes when you poke the beehive with a stick, you don't get honey, you get stung.

Nosferatu wrote:
momgamer wrote:

Then you're not reading. Malor starts it off on the other thread, and four posts above mine MrDeVil909 is claiming that Mike's post "released the dickwolves". In this thread alone, disobedientlib, Nosferatu, Crawling Chaos, Prederick, TheHipGamer all have couched the discussion in those terms. ClockworkHouse is all over page two and three of the other one.

In this thread my only comment regarding PA was that I had no issue with what Mike did, given that the phone number he released wasn't intentionally a home phone number (sometimes with a small business the divide between home and business gets fuzzy).
Personally I accept the fact that sometimes when you poke the beehive with a stick, you don't get honey, you get stung.

I'm sorry, I agree with what you say here, but that's not what point I was trying to make. The reason I pointed you out is your characterizing the problem as Mike being the only bee to come out of the hive. And considering where they stung him, I feel their presence needs to be discussed.