Call For Writers -- 2009

Gamerswithjobs.com is looking for writers!

Luxurious trips, fabulous wealth and the adoration of millions, these are just a few of the things we don’t offer. However, if you are passionate about gaming and more importantly about creating witty, interesting, compelling written content, then we can provide you with both a platform and one of the best communities on the web.

As a writer for GWJ you have the opportunity to build a portfolio of work that can and has launched more than a few writing careers. If you’ve longed for an opportunity to get your shot at writing about video games for a living, then we provide an avenue for reaching that goal. If you have a unique perspective you simply want to share with thousands of your closest friends — well, we can help you with that as well.

Read on to find out details on submitting. Ability to read and follow basic instructions will be part of the deciding factor, so please read carefully.

What to Submit: Submissions should be attached to an e-mail. E-mail entries should be sent to [email protected] with the subject “Call for Writers '09 Entry.” Any entries submitted to an incorrect address, with an incorrect subject or without proper attachments will not be considered.

Submissions should be between 750 and 1,000 words. The topic is unrestricted, but should relate in some way to the video game industry or gamer culture. Submissions should be double spaced with traditional 1” margins and submitted as a Word (.doc) document.

Do not submit links to your blog, old articles on other sites, or your resume. We are looking for original, unpublished material which would be suitable for publication on our front page.

Writers retain all rights to submissions, and we will not print or distribute your submission without prior approval.

When to Submit: Submissions will be accepted through 11:59 pm CST June 20, 2009.

Things You Need to Know: GWJ is not a paying outlet at this time, and there is no guarantee, or even really a plan for compensating our writers.

Instead, GWJ expects all writers (yes, even including me) to participate in a peer feedback and editorial review process. This is really the compensation for being a GWJ writer -- you will get regular, intense feedback from some of the best editors and writers in the business. Of course, you will have to be able to play nice with others and be gracious in accepting criticism.

We do not guarantee that a new writer position will be made available if submitted drafts fail to meet our needs or standards. This isn't a contest where we announce a winner. It's a job application. By the same token, we retain the right to terminate writer relationships at any time and for any reason.

Tips of Crafting a Good Submission:

Be creative — seriously, points for creativity
Hook us from the start — We tend to get a lot of submissions, and are easily distracted.
Proofread — Typos, that’s a paddlin’.
Edit, tighten and improve — Your first draft can be better. Get someone to look at what you write, take your time and put something together that stands out. Rabbit wanted in so bad he sent his "Nigerian Prince" submission out to millions for comments before it came our way.

Good luck and we can’t wait to read your articles!

Comments

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Typos, that’s a paddlin’.

Chiggie, You had damn well better be applying. If I had 1/10 your writing ability and creativity I'd be applying in a heartbeat.

Instead, I'm begging you to get involved (unless you already are, but I don't think I've seen your work on the front page) and looking forward to seeing any great, new GWJ writers.

Good luck everyone!

Chiggie used to write on the front page. Good stuff.

I'm fairly surprised to see this, I didn't think this place lacked for content.

It's not about lacking for content. Our current stable of writers is outstanding, and we're not planning any big changes. But, it's always good to keep new voices coming in, and if that means we can provide even more content then so be it.

I certainly hoped my comment wasn't perceived as a slam to current staff. My perception was that in the past as writers moved on you'd put this call out.

Do you need a full-time job to write for Gamers with Jobs?

Don't tell Elysium, but we've voted him off the island.

All hail King Corona!

I want to expand on Elysium's point about editorial review. GWJ offers access to such rigorous, intelligent peer review -- not just "wow, this is good" or "I don't like this", but truly meaningful, actionable critique -- that I often feel I should be paying my fellow writers for their time. (We once had a three page debate about the 'em' dash. No lie.)

Certainly, the review process has made me a better writer, and I've formed deep professional and personal bonds with those involved. GWJ quite literally launched my career as a writer, and I feel confident attributing much of my success to our behind-the-scenes editorial review.

The thing is: It's not for the weak-hearted. If you want someone to tell you how much they like your writing, and how glad they are that you wrote this, or other such vague non-statements, then find a writer's circle in town, and be content. But if you want someone to tell you that you use redundant metaphors, dangle your participles and verge on almost obsessive use of passive voice, well, then you've found the right spot. We've long since abandoned the kid gloves.

I say this because GWJ isn't just a platform for you to gain an audience; it's a place to improve your skills. No how many comments we make and however many days or weeks your piece languishes in editorial review, we do it because we believe in you. I know that sounds cliche, but it's true.

And I have to say: The pride I feel when a piece I've massacred in review goes on to become a grand slam… That is a beautiful feeling. It's one you may become addicted to. The only thing that feels as good as success is watching someone else you helped also succeed.

I certainly hoped my comment wasn't perceived as a slam to current staff.

I certainly didn't read it that way. I thought you posed a totally valid question.

The only thing that feels as good as success is watching someone else you helped also succeed.

If I were a man who used phrases like QFT, I'd do it here. Fortunately, I'm not.

If you're reading this comment, go read Kat's again. She said everything I wanted to say, but better.

Which is typical.

But yeah, writing for GWJ is not for the thin skinned. I've never received the level of feedback and criticism for my work that I do here, to the point where I'm concerned if I *don't* have to rewrite entire sections when I write for other outlets. We will not make you feel good about mediocre work. Hopefully we'll help you make good work brilliant.

I've wanted to get into writing about games as a side hobby, mostly because I always find myself with things to say about them but I just don't think I'm good enough to live up to the understandably high standards of the site. My vocabulary is just not diverse enough to make points without using the same few adjectives. I've been penning some user reviews for GiantBomb and submitting some stuff to Dan Hsu's new site Bitmob which is kind of neat in that everything gets posted and the stuff the staff likes best gets picked out, cleaned up and promoted to the front page. If you want to sharpen your skills and don't have the time to run a blog of your own, these might be good ways to start. But if you do get accepted to write here, know that you have managed to go above a far that's several miles higher than most of the industry that covers games.

KaterinLHC wrote:
(We once had a three page debate about the 'em' dash. No lie.)

Tread carefully, lass; that fire still smolders.

I'm extremely interested in this writing opportunity and will submit an entry soon. I've always had a passion for writing about games but unfortunately, never took much initiative to act on those ambitions. *prepares to get massacred*

I don't feel I know enough about writing in general to believe I'll actually make the final cut. That said if I spend the next month editing a piece I would like to think that article would be interesting enough to make someone reading it think I could be competent if I kept on trying for a few more years. Is there any chance of that kind of entry receiving constructive feedback or are you usually so overwhelmed with submissions that you'll just delete sub-par entries and move on?

I right good. Can I join you're group?

We read everything, but there's no way we can do a "line-by" on everything. It takes me about an hour to do a line-by-line edit/feedback on a 1,000 word piece.

As for frequency -- if you look back, we've done this just about every year. It's just a way to keep the pool full, and encourage folks who may have been on the fence to go ahead and send something in.

bnpederson wrote:
I don't feel I know enough about writing in general to believe I'll actually make the final cut. That said if I spend the next month editing a piece I would like to think that article would be interesting enough to make someone reading it think I could be competent if I kept on trying for a few more years. Is there any chance of that kind of entry receiving constructive feedback or are you usually so overwhelmed with submissions that you'll just delete sub-par entries and move on?

When I wrote the Far Cry 2 review I went through several iterations and heartache at the same time but it got better as they gave good feedback in return. Trust me, the people at GWJ are fantastic.

As a life-long writer with a passion for games and a need for a personal project that gives me some sense of accomplishment but doesn't take over my brain, I feel compelled to apply.

As a coward who fears rejection and, in spite of the life-long writer thing, am intimidated and awed by the 12 year old kids who write more interestingly than I do on the subject, I feel compelled to pre-reject myself and resent the GWJ staff for the rest of my life.

Where is Anton Chigurh with his fate-deciding coin toss when you need him?

Deadron wrote:
Where is Anton Chigurh with his fate-deciding coin toss when you need him?

Perhaps he's been confounded by probability.

I don't want to write, but I would love to be a fly on the wall for the discussions. Any chance a select few of the discussions could be made available for public consumption, but not comment?

I'm interested in the process.

sheared wrote:
I don't want to write, but I would love to be a fly on the wall for the discussions. Any chance a select few of the discussions could be made available for public consumption, but not comment?

I'm interested in the process.

Not a chance. It's all Kat saying "Bitchesss" over and over again.

rabbit wrote:
Not a chance. It's all Kat saying "Bitchesss" over and over again.
Mind. Blown.

I don't want to write, but I would love to be a fly on the wall for the discussions. Any chance a select few of the discussions could be made available for public consumption, but not comment?

Just to confirm, the short answer is no. What happens in Writer's Guild stays in Writer's Guild!

Plant?

rabbit wrote:
sheared wrote:
I don't want to write, but I would love to be a fly on the wall for the discussions. Any chance a select few of the discussions could be made available for public consumption, but not comment?

I'm interested in the process.

Not a chance. It's all Kat saying "Bitchesss" over and over again.

C'mon, be fair. I throw in a "Team Human!" in there every now and then, too.

I'm going to throw my hat in the ring. Again. One quick question, and maybe I am a filthy skimmer: this new writer you are looking for is expected to produce how many front page worthy smart bombs per month?

Maybe I can just take over the week ahead.

Right now, we're just looking for talent that we're interested in developing.

We expect people to work a piece up for review every 2 weeks.

EDIT: Or whatever Elysium says.

Rabbit's assessment is pretty typical, but I don't want to put the cart ahead of the horse.

Is the mighty Elysium and Certis ready for the likes of my writing? Maybe. They will see soon.

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