Osmos

Osmos is a simple game, where you control an organism that grows by absorbing smaller organisms. You can move about by expelling material with the mouse button, but each click makes your organism smaller. You dodge and weave about the map trying to make tiny course adjustments yet still absorb other organisms in order to grow. But watch out for larger organisms, touch them and they'll suck you dry.

It's a simple game, but it's appeal lies in the patience and control required to win. You could just hold down the mouse button to move, expelling matter like crazy to reach your target. However you would arrive at your destination so small that instead you would become a tasty snack. The trick lies in using patient, small clicks to slowly propel yourself in the right direction. It's a challenging and addictive to try and grow your little organism as big as possible.

There are also curveballs thrown at you such as other “intelligent” life forms like the “Scaredy” who avoids you at all costs until it's big enough to eat you. Several forces are also at play in some of the levels, like the “Repeller” orb which actively repels any organisms. It's a game about patience, and the graphics complement this with calming, abstract art. Trace music in the background completes the scene.

Why You Should Check This Out: Addicting, simple gameplay with soothing graphics. An exercise in physics, control and patience creates a game that's challenging but calming. I find myself playing the levels long after I've completed my goal.

[size=20]Play Demo Now[/size]

[size=18]Steam[/size]

Comments

Neat! This sounds like it's sort of a resource-management game. Like your organism in Osmos, real life predators have to carefully decide how much energy to expend to get the next meal. That's what always bothers me about sci-fi or fantasy movies where a huge predator spends a great amount of energy just to eat a little human, especially when a larger creature has just been killed. (Star Trek 2009, The dinosaurs in King Kong, Jurassic Park, etc)

I guess you could see it as a strategy / physics hybrid. The other half of the game is correctly judging thrust and trying to intersect with the other organisms. Strategy physics games, hmm. I wonder if there are other examples.

I played this demo a month ago, and I personally didn't feel like buying it. It's a cool concept, but not for me I suppose.

I've had the demo sitting on my desktop since GDC . . . I guess this post is the cosmos telling me it's time to give it a go.

Thanks for the tip! This is a great game.

Grubber788 wrote:

I played this demo a month ago, and I personally didn't feel like buying it. It's a cool concept, but not for me I suppose.

I wanted to buy it and play the full version. Guess the full version isn't out yet thought because I couldn't find it.

KrazyTacoFO wrote:
Grubber788 wrote:

I played this demo a month ago, and I personally didn't feel like buying it. It's a cool concept, but not for me I suppose.

I wanted to buy it and play the full version. Guess the full version isn't out yet thought because I couldn't find it.

Hmm I could've sworn Steam had a release date listed. Hopefully the full version comes out soon.

Ooooh....pretty. I kept playing and playing. Have to go back and see if I can eat the sun.

These type of games don't usually grab me. But this one is relaxing, and I'm hooked.

Kind of a mellow experience. I like it, particularly how laid back it is.