Things you should know by now, but only just discovered

Janthe_X wrote:

Select text in Word.

Shift + F3 toggles between all caps, initial caps, and lower case.

FTFY.

maverickz wrote:
Clumber wrote:
Gremlin wrote:

The natives in the area likely tried to help the Donner party, but the settlers shot at them instead.

Until now the Native American perspective has been left out of the telling of the Donner tragedy, not because the wel mel ti did not remember the pioneers, but because they were never asked, or perhaps were not ready to share. Their oral tradition recalls the starving strangers who camped in an area that was unsuitable for that time of year. Taking pity on the pioneers, the northern Washoe attempted to feed them, leaving rabbit meat and wild potatoes near the camps. Another account states that they tried to bring the Donner Party a deer carcass, but were shot at as they approached. Later, some wel mel ti observed the migrants eating human remains. Fearing for their lives, the area's native inhabitants continued to watch the strangers but avoided further contact. These stories, and the archaeological evidence that appears to support them, certainly complicated my interpretation of the Donner Party event. The migrants at Alder Creek were not surviving in the mountains alone—the northern Washoe were there, and they had tried to help.

Until I read this, and subsequently looked it up, I always thought the Donner party was something that happend in more modern times. Was there some other group of individuals that made the news because they died in the Sierra Nevada's in more recent history?

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List...

Not gonna lie, that was waaaaaay more cannibalism in modern times than I was expecting.

I didn't read that it was only in Word, and have been trying it everywhere across systems with no luck. It should be everywhere.

One of the stories has 2 native guides who ran off when they found the party was going to kill them too. Rich idiots that didn't listen to "hey don't go that way go this way, please wait." Who needs a 2-story wagon?

Bonus_Eruptus wrote:

I didn't read that it was only in Word, and have been trying it everywhere across systems with no luck. It should be everywhere.

If you're on MacOS, the system-wide "Services" (found in the app menu) does All Caps, Initial Caps Of Sentences, Initial Caps Of Words, Lowercase, and Rot13, in addition to sorting lines ascending or descending, in any box that takes text input.

Edit: Whoops, that's actually DevonAgent's WordService, a free (and incredibly useful) plug-in for the OS-wide Services menu. It's so obligatory on my Macs I forgot it wasn't actually part of the OS.

"In 1966, Charles DeGaulle ordered all U.S. Troops out of France, as he said the country was leaving NATO, LBJ's first words were to his Secretary of State, Dean Rusk, "Ask him about the cemetaries, Dean!"

When Dean Rusk mentioned whether or not the 60,000+ US soldiers buried in France were to be removed, DeGaulle simply stood up and left the room, embarrassed."

From a thread on the biggest f— yous in history.

I remember hearing about that. There’s an account I read that I often think about when France and WW2 are mentioned.

Fighting was going on in some French villages and not others. Two American soldiers had been sent to the edge of an, as yet, uncontested village in order to survey the countryside beyond. When they didn't return another man was sent out to look for them. He found the two soldiers dead in the church yard. A stray mortar had landed next to them killing the pair instantly. The guy went back to report and get stretchers and stretcher bearers to remove the bodies. When they returned both bodies were covered in small bouquets of flowers tied with ribbons in the colours of the French flag.

Since those are the colors of the American flag, too, who's to know which flag they were referencing?

Evan E wrote:

Since those are the colors of the American flag, too, who's to know which flag they were referencing?

Well I'm sure that occurred to them. Either way it was a beautiful gesture.

I was helping a student draw a horse and she, as a horse owner, pointed out that the lower part of the horses leg has not muscle at all just tendons. Which I realised was pretty obvious; I'd just never though about it. She went on to say that the horses hoof is actually an evolved nail and what you might think is the knee or elbow in a horses leg is actually the ankle and wrist respectively.

Here is a horses leg compared to a dogs leg (which also has the extended foot thing going on.) The stifle is the knee, the hock is the ankle. There is also a video of the bone structure being explained.

IMAGE(https://i.pinimg.com/originals/d9/ab/dd/d9abddb7c976a96da5057470d2494e0f.jpg)

Banoffee is a blend of 'banana' and 'toffee' and not, as I thought, a region of France or possibly Italy.

Higgledy, doesn't that turn their back legs into giant spring-loaded launchers? I seem to recall that being why dogs and horses can move so quickly.

Further, I understand that horses organs shift so much while galloping that they have to time their breathing with their gait, and the weight of the organs shifting back and forth drives the breath as well as the gait. Remarkable animals.

Robear wrote:

Higgledy, doesn't that turn their back legs into giant spring-loaded launchers? I seem to recall that being why dogs and horses can move so quickly.

Further, I understand that horses organs shift so much while galloping that they have to time their breathing with their gait, and the weight of the organs shifting back and forth drives the breath as well as the gait. Remarkable animals.

For the leg part, that's basically how we work too.
Think about how humans sprint or even do quick moves. The thighs and knees are length of stride and power. Our ankles handle the controlled stopping and starting.
Still cool for each.

Robear wrote:

Higgledy, doesn't that turn their back legs into giant spring-loaded launchers? I seem to recall that being why dogs and horses can move so quickly.

Yes I guess it does

Robear wrote:

Further, I understand that horses organs shift so much while galloping that they have to time their breathing with their gait, and the weight of the organs shifting back and forth drives the breath as well as the gait. Remarkable animals.

Hadn’t thought about that either but, yes, all those massive organs sloshing back and forth inside the body must act like a piston.

They are incredible. Gorgeous creatures yet so strange in form. Drawing them really makes you appreciate how odd their facial structure is.

I was once out scouting a walk and had to cross through a field with a mother and young foal. The foal wandered up to me. It ended up standing very close, so lanky and delicate. The mother just stood a little way away watching us. It’s one of my abiding memories.

CPWilson wrote:

Banoffee is a blend of 'banana' and 'toffee'

Portmanteau!

Keithustus wrote:
CPWilson wrote:

Banoffee is a blend of 'banana' and 'toffee'

Portmanteau!

I love a glass of portmanteau.

CPWilson wrote:

Banoffee is a blend of 'banana' and 'toffee' and not, as I thought, a region of France or possibly Italy.

I had never heard of banoffee before I started watching the Great British Bake-Off.

And it seems like Mary Berry and Paul Hollywood had never heard of peanut butter and jelly before judging the Great British Bake-Off. Things can be very different across the Atlantic, I guess.

'Jelly' in the US and 'Jelly' in the UK are two very different things - you wouldn't contemplate cooking with the latter. Or, indeed, eating it, unless you are very young.

Not to be confused with the British jam sandwich.

IMAGE(https://www.thecourier.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/sites/12/2016/04/image.jpg1_.786491.jpg)

davet010 wrote:

'Jelly' in the US and 'Jelly' in the UK are two very different things - you wouldn't contemplate cooking with the latter. Or, indeed, eating it, unless you are very young.

Well you've clearly never had my wife's trifle.

Wow, this conversation went risque really fast...

I assumed eyebrow threading was for people that had no/not enough eyebrows after overdoing shaping or whatever for cosmetic purposes. Like it was putting new artificial 'threads' in there.

It's actually a method for removing the eyebrow hair for the purpose of shaping. So more sensical than I was thinking. But still seems more gross than something I would want to do. I guess I will have slightly ugly natural eyebrows forever.

davet010 wrote:

'Jelly' in the US and 'Jelly' in the UK are two very different things - you wouldn't contemplate cooking with the latter. Or, indeed, eating it, unless you are very young.

Or, you're a white person in the 70s.